Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Berners-Lee: Demand your data from Internet companies

Cameron Scott | April 20, 2012
Tim Berners-Lee has said that the problem with companies like Facebook and Google is not that they collect vast troves of data about their users, but that they don't share with them what they learn from it.

Calo thought seeing the data companies have collected on them would clarify privacy questions for many users.

Compared to "reading generalities about the information that a company might have about you, which is what privacy policies are, being able to access the information that the company does have is much better," he said.

In order for users to draw the kind of useful personal insights Berners-Lee pointed to, data from one source would have to be compatible with data from another. As an advocate of the "open Web," Berners-Lee often argues for data formats to be standardized.

Standardizing data formats would also make it easier for users to opt to leave a service whose privacy practices they don't like, Calo said. That could spur "privacy competition," in which Web services companies would compete for users based on the quality of their privacy policies. The result could be more consumer privacy.

Calo said, by not addressing consumer concerns about privacy, Berners-Lee was "missing a selling point of his idea" of an open Web.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.