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Streaming music showdown: Xbox Music versus the world

Brad Chacos | Nov. 19, 2012
If music soothes the savage breast, then why are so many 800-pound gorillas slugging it out in a battle for your eardrums? Microsoft recently stepped back into the streaming music fray with Xbox Music Pass, a revitalized Zune Pass replacement that's baked right into Windows 8 and Windows RT. It may be pretty and it may be (somewhat) free, but Xbox Music Pass faces stiff competition from a crowd of contenders that includes heavyweights such as Pandora, Rdio, Slacker and Spotify.

If music soothes the savage breast, then why are so many 800-pound gorillas slugging it out in a battle for your eardrums? Microsoft recently stepped back into the streaming music fray with Xbox Music Pass, a revitalized Zune Pass replacement that's baked right into Windows 8 and Windows RT. It may be pretty and it may be (somewhat) free, but Xbox Music Pass faces stiff competition from a crowd of contenders that includes heavyweights such as Pandora, Rdio, Slacker and Spotify.

How does Xbox Music Pass stack up against the entrenched alternatives? Let's compare Microsoft's latest streaming music service against the big hitters mentioned above.

Xbox Music Pass

Xbox Music Pass may be part of the Windows 8 Music app, but it's no slouch. Microsoft's streaming music service offers more than 18 million songs for U.S. customers, and you can fill its handful of coverage gaps by paying for tracks à la carte in the Xbox Music digital storefront.

The "Smart DJ" mode does a decent job of generating playlists inspired by your favorite artists and songs. The audio quality sounds good, though the 192-kbps bit rate won't impress dedicated audiophiles. The polished interface wows. Like the rest of Windows 8, however, it's prone to emphasizing attractiveness over usability, resulting in superfluous clicks and swipes.

Xbox Music Pass offers free unlimited listening for a limited period, allowing you to pay for your freeloading ways by tolerating the occasional audio ad. After six months, Microsoft slams on the brakes and limits your listening to 10 hours each month.

Springing for a $10 monthly premium subscription ditches the ads and opens streaming to Windows Phone 8 handsets and Xbox 360 consoles, which raises my biggest qualm about Xbox Music Pass: It's available only on Windows 8, Windows RT, Windows Phone 8, and the Xbox 360. Android and iOS support will come "within 12 months," but current Windows 7 and Windows Phone 7 users are left out in the cold.

This severely limits Xbox Music Pass's reach and usefulness, dropping it to second-tier status for all but the most fervent Microsoft faithful. And why do I need to be a $60 yearly Xbox Live Gold subscriber to use Music Pass on my console? Isn't that what I'm paying $10 each month for?

Catalog size: 18 million-plus

Audio quality: 192-kbps WMA streaming; 256-kbps streaming for à la carte digital downloads

Subscription plans: Unlimited ad-supported free listening for six months, limited duration after; $10 monthly fee removes ads and unlocks device support

Device support: Windows 8, Windows RT, Xbox 360 (requires Xbox Live Gold subscription), Windows Phone 8

Extras: Smart DJ radio listening, console support, à la carte downloads (per-download à la carte songs stream to any device you're signed in to)

 

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