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Sex, lies and core values: Jobs

The Melbourne Age | June 4, 2010
Apple chief executive Steve Jobs doled out technology wisdom while answering questions on the company's practices, preferences and the competition during a lengthy on-stage interview at an All Things Digital conference in Rancho Palos Verdes, US.

AUSTRALIA, 3 JUNE 2010 - Apple chief executive Steve Jobs doled out technology wisdom while answering questions on the company's practices, preferences and the competition during a lengthy on-stage interview at an All Things Digital conference in Rancho Palos Verdes, US.

Google, Microsoft, Adobe, app developers and his own sex life were all fair game for the tech supremo and his interviewers.

He dismissed hype about Google's ability to reignite the free-to-air TV market with the recently announced Google TV, revealing that Apple's own TV strategy remained "a hobby".

"The TV is going to lose in our eyes until there is a better go-to-market strategy," Jobs said.

"No one wants to buy a box. Ask TiVo, ask Roku, ask us ... ask Google in a few months."

On Google going from ally to rival, with Android-software based smartphones challenging iPhones and now Google TV, he said the competition was one-sided.

"We didn't go into the search business," Jobs said, adding Apple has no plans to do so in the future. "They started competing with us and got more and more serious."

Google chief executive Eric Schmidt resigned from the Apple board of directors last year as the companies increasingly became rivals.

Jobs said Apple doesn't intend to block Google software from the firm's iPhones, iPods, iPads, and Macintosh computers.

"Just because we're competing with somebody doesn't mean we have to be rude," Jobs said.

When asked if he felt betrayed by Google's entry into the mobile space without in as much as a friendly phone call, he quipped: "My sex life is pretty good these days. How's yours?".

Jobs was not so kind to Adobe Systems, standing behind a ban on widely used Flash video software in Apple gadgets.

Jobs dismissed Flash as an antiquated program giving way to a new HTML 5 format.

"Sometimes you just have to pick the things that look like they?re going to be the right kind of horses to ride going forward, and Flash looks like a technology that had it?s day but is really waning," Jobs said.

"HTML5 looks like the technology that is really on the ascendancy right now."

He reserved harsh words to application developers who complain about the App Store's approval process, saying mistakes and delays happen but 95 per cent of apps are approved within one week.

"People lie", he said. "They run to the press and tell people about this oppression and they get their 15 minutes of fame (...) We don't do that".

Apple's iconic leader also defended the company's harsh reaction to a new-generation iPhone prototype getting into the hands of technology news website Gizmodo, which paid for the gadget and posted an analysis online.

 

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