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Oakley and Intel pack a fitness coach into new pair of smart glasses

Agam Shah | Sept. 22, 2016
Oakley's Radar Pace smart glasses have a voice-activated coaching system, thanks to technology from Intel

Also, the added-on tech hasn't looked cool in some smart glasses. The technology protruding out of Google Glass was so visible that it upset people who thought they were being spied on. Oakley and Intel came up with a design where the technology is as hidden as possible, though the headsets are clearly visible on the side.

The smartphone app that works with Radar Pace also can pull data from other fitness apps and devices to formulate workouts. That's handy, especially when people like using Fitbit and other devices to track fitness data.

The sunglasses weigh 56 grams and run for about four to six hours on a single battery charge. They have an accelerometer, gyroscope, and sensors to measure pressure, humidity, and proximity.

The glasses have some cool add-on features. They can play your favorite music on the smartphone. You can take phone calls via Radar Pace, and the app works with Android and iOS devices.

For Intel, the Radar Pace is a breakthrough in wearables. The chipmaker has a handful of wearable products on the market, but Radar Pace is the most important for the company.

Unfortunately for Intel, the glasses don't use an x86 chip, but an embedded processor based on another architecture that Intel wouldn't specify. That also highlights a  problem -- Intel's chips aren't used in many wearables partly because the company doesn't have the right processors in its portfolio. Intel is committed to developing chips for wearables, a representative said.

 

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