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Devices will change how people work, says Duursma

Hafizah Osman | May 29, 2013
Mobility and the proliferation of mobile devices are changing and will further change the way people work, according to Citrix Labs vice-president and office chair chief technology officer, Martin Duursma.

Mobility and the proliferation of mobile devices are changing and will further change the way people work, according to Citrix Labs vice-president and office chair chief technology officer, Martin Duursma.

He was speaking at the Citrix's Synergy 2013 conference, held in Los Angeles.

Duursma said consumers prefer to use mobile devices to traditional technologies, such as the PC, and its growth has resulted in a decline in PC sales.

"Three years ago, tablet computing was nowhere, we didn't understand its impact on the industry. Fast forward to this year, PC sales in Europe fell 30 per cent and no one would have predicted this three years ago," he said.

Duursma claimed there are four big shifts occurring in the workforce:

Businesses are rethinking how to deal with employees—Duursma claimed employees are bringing in their own IT systems through mobile devices and employers have to think how to provision enterprise services, the right security and governance into their employee's pre-previsioned IT environment.

Change in the way devices are used in a work environment—he highlighted that there will soon be a rise of a 'wearable nation of devices', such as Google glasses.

"It's an indicator of a lot of the innovation that's occurring. Many companies are now looking at wearable devices that will make people more productive. Businesses have to think about how this will sit in a workplace environment," Duursma said.

Office cultures are changing too—Duursma said that more people in the workforce are doing more work shifting and working from home, but that's not the complete solution to adopting a changing work culture.

"Whole offices are starting to develop around third spaces, such as Starbucks, for example, because people are craving human contact. What this means is that you need to completely rethink how you do your offices to avoid empty spaces and creating quieter or noisier zones."

Customers are becoming partners—Duursma said this is a rising trend as businesses need to supply application programming interfaces (APIs) that interact with customers and suppliers.

"People expect to interact with your organization in an API manner. This means that there is a whole set of new rules that have been developed for the enterprise organisation, for example transparency and trust when dealing with data or having enterprise dashboards," he said.

Duursma also mentioned that businesses are incorporating social media into their daily use for feedback and customer service.

"t's a critical thing working with social media in making sure that your company is well represented and doing the right thing for your customers, and all these are going to drive the workplace of the future," he added.

 

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