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Complete guide to Siri: How to set up Siri in iOS 9 & train it to recognise your voice

David Price | Oct. 26, 2015
Our complete guide to Siri explains how to use Siri, details all the Siri features and commands (including iOS 9) and helps you get more out of Siri on your iPhone or iPad.

It is also hooked up to the Maps application, so it can locate businesses, movie times, restaurants and bars near you. One of the great things about Siri is asking it to find things in your local area.

There are a few scenarios in which Siri truly excels. The first of those is when you're in a hands-free situation, mostly likely when driving a car. (The iPad knows when you're going hands-free and becomes chattier, reading text aloud that it might not if it knows you're holding it in your hand.) Siri is also deeply integrated with the directions feature in Maps, and the iPad works as a fantastic (if slightly oversized) voice-activated satnav.

When you get a message, you can instruct Siri to read the message, and it will. You can then tell it to reply to the message, dictate the entire message, have Siri read it back to you to confirm that it makes sense, and then send it. You can also ask Siri to read out your Mail messages and it'll let you know who sent you a message and what the subject line is.

In the rest of this feature we'll list all the commands and features you can activate using Siri, but Siri itself will offer some tips in this regard. Start Siri going by holding the Home button, then wait without asking any questions: Siri will start cycling through pages of suggested commands.

How to use Siri: Sample questions

How to use Siri: Get Siri to help you with daily tasks


Siri can access the Settings, which makes it much easier to quickly make changes. You can also ask it to search Twitter.

Even if you're not driving and don't intend to use it completely hands-free, Siri can still be useful. In fact, the feature proves that some tasks can be done much faster through speech than through clicking, tapping and swiping. It's much easier to set an alarm or timer using Siri than it is to unlock your tablet, find the Clock app, and tap within the app. Just say, "Set a timer for three minutes", and your iPad begins to count down until your tea is ready. "Set an alarm for 5am" does what you'd expect, instantly. "Remind me to record my favourite show" and "Note that I need to take my suit to the cleaners" work, too. These are short bursts of data input that can be handled quickly by voice, and we've found they work well.

 

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