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Chromebook Pixel revisited: 18 months with Google's luxury laptop

JR Raphael | Aug. 29, 2014

2. Display

The display — man, oh man, the display. The Pixel's 12.85-in. 2560-x-1700 IPS screen is like candy for your eyes. The vast majority of Chromebook screens (yes, even those that offer 1080p resolution) are still using junky TN panels and consequently look pretty awful. The two exceptions are the same systems mentioned above — the HP 11 and the ThinkPad Yoga 11e — but while those devices' displays reign superior in the sub-$500 category, their low resolution is no match for the Pixel's crystal-clear image quality.

I continue to appreciate the Pixel's touchscreen capability to this day, too: While I certainly don't put my fingers on the screen all the time, it's really nice to have the ability to reach up and tap, scroll, or pinch when I feel the urge. For as much time as I spend using smartphones and tablets, it seems completely natural to be able to do that with a laptop as well. (Admit it: You've tried to touch a non-touchscreen laptop at some point. We all have.)

I will say this, though: The time I've spent recently with the Yoga 11e has definitely gotten me keen on the idea of a Chromebook being able to convert into a tablet-like setup. After using that device, I sometimes find myself wishing the Pixel's display could tilt back further and provide that sort of slate-style experience.

3. Stamina and performance

At about five hours per charge, the Pixel's battery life is passable but not exceptional — especially compared to the eight to 10 hours we're seeing on some systems these days. As I've mused before, stamina is the Pixel's Achilles' heel.

Performance is where things get particularly interesting: When the Pixel first came out, its horsepower was unheard of for a Chrome OS device. I could actually use the system in my typical power-user way, with tons of windows and tabs running at the same time and no slowdowns or multitasking misery. Compared to the sluggish Chrome OS systems we'd seen up to that point, it felt like a full-fledged miracle.

The Pixel's performance is no less impressive today, but what's changed is that other Chrome OS systems have actually come close to catching up. These days, you can get solid performance in a Chromebook for around $200 with the various Haswell-based systems. The newer Core i3 devices give you a little more punch for around $300. Neither quite reaches the Pixel's level of snappiness and speed, but in practical terms, they're not too far behind.

So for most folks, performance alone is no longer a reason to own the Pixel. It's an important part of the Pixel, for sure, but if that's the only thing you're interested in, you'd do far better to save yourself the cash and get a lower-end Chromebook with decent internals.

 

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