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Tim Cook pens emotional Steve Jobs essay on the anniversary of Jobs' death

Oscar Raymundo | Oct. 6, 2015
Apple's CEO recalls his last days with Steve Jobs: "He was unselfish in the face of his own mortality."

steve jobs memorial

Monday, October 5, marks the fourth year anniversary of Steve Jobs’ death. He would’ve been 60 this year.

To commemorate Jobs’ life and legacy, several Apple executives, including Apple CEO Tim Cook, penned personal remembrances that were posted on AppleWeb, Cupertino’s internal news website.

“He was unselfish in the face of his own mortality,” wrote Cook, recalling his last days with the iconic Apple co-founder. Cook shared how he had offered Jobs a portion of own liver for a donor liver transplant, but Jobs refused.

“Even when his outlook was bleak and he had every right to accept help, he refused, rather than put a friend’s health at risk,” Cook continued. “He put his compassion for me above his own needs, and I will never forget it.”

Below is Tim Cook’s essay in full, as first posted on BuzzFeed:

In February of 2009, Steve was on a leave of absence from Apple and spending his time at his home. I would drop by after work and discuss many things with him. He was waiting for a liver transplant and his health seemed to be rapidly deteriorating. One day in particular, he seemed especially ill and I left feeling so distraught that I threw up in his yard.

I was worried he would not live long enough to reach the top of the waiting list for a cadaver liver. After checking out my own health and researching donor liver transplants, I visited Steve again and told him I wanted to give him a portion of my liver. Despite his condition and the uncertainty of whether he would live long enough to be at the top of the waiting list, he adamantly refused to accept my offer for fear it would place my own health in jeopardy.

That was the kind of person he was. He was unselfish in the face of his own mortality. Even when his outlook was bleak and he had every right to accept help, he refused, rather than put a friend’s health at risk. He put his compassion for me above his own needs, and I will never forget it.

Other Apple executives also wrote personal remembrances on AppleWeb, and subsequently transcribed by Mashable. Apple’s vice president of internet software and services Eddy Cue described Jobs as sometimes a brother, sometimes a father figure. Vice president of software technology Bud Tribble remembered Jobs’ artful vision when he took the original Mac team to a Louis Comfort Tiffany exhibit in San Francisco. Member of Apple’s Board of Directors Andrea Jung called him thoughtful and caring, “a true friend.” Senior vice president of marketing Phil Schiller recalled how Jobs’ happiness and pride would fuel the entire team backstage during the product events.

 

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