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This year, PC gaming breaks free from your desktop

Alex Wawro | Jan. 11, 2013
As the CES show continues its clear that PC games are only going to become better, more accessible and easier to play whenever and wherever you want. Whether you want to run through a few rounds of Call of Duty on your Windows 8 tablet, sit down to some SimCity on your HDTV or simply stream XCOM: Enemy Unknown to a handheld the size of your smartphone, 2013 will have the tech you need to make it work.

CES usually doesn't yield much in the way of new and exciting gaming technology. This year is different: while big publishers like Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony are still saving their announcements for the E3 gaming convention in June. We've seen a ton of intriguing new gaming technology here at CES from companies like Nvidia, Razer and Valve. As the show continues its clear that PC games are only going to become better, more accessible and easier to play whenever and wherever you want. Whether you want to run through a few rounds of Call of Duty on your Windows 8 tablet, sit down to some SimCity on your HDTV or simply stream XCOM: Enemy Unknown to a handheld the size of your smartphone, 2013 will have the tech you need to make it work.

PC gaming goes mobile

The big trend in gaming technology this year is making PC gaming more mobile, either by streaming games from a PC to a mobile device or simply packing decent performance into a portable tablet.

We've seen similar technology before: defunct game streaming service OnLive was developing a client for streaming PC games directly to your iPad. But this year, companies like Nvidia are banking on expansive broadband internet access to make the business of streaming games viable. Nvidia's GRID aims to make PC gaming accessible to users who don't have the time or funds to build a performance PC. A GRID sever combines stacks of high-powered Nvidia GPUs with custom algorithms built specifically to service players streaming games remotely. The system should allow Nvidia to dynamically allocate processing power to users as they play games on their mobile devices, PCs or HDTVs, eliminating the hassle of driver updates and system requirements which keep many people from enjoying the best PC games on the market.

Those of us who actually enjoy owning a ridiculously expensive performance PC but hate having to play games at our desk might get a bit more rest and relaxation in 2013, as playing PC games on a mobile device have suddenly become an appealing proposition. Throughout 2012 I was itching to pick up a Microsoft Surface Pro so I could have access to my favorite PC games without having to lug around a bulky laptop, but now that I've seen the Razer Edge in action at CES I don't know if I want a Windows 8 tablet that's not optimized for gaming.

The Edge is an expensive proposition, but it works as well as a decent gaming laptop and weighs quite a bit less. It's also awfully versatile; if you pick up an Edge in 2013 you'll be able to play PC games like Bioshock Infinite or the new SimCity whether you're lying in bed, or riding to work. The various docking accessories are a little expensive for my tastes, but it's nice to have the option of using a keyboard dock or analog sticks if that's how you prefer to play. The docking station also makes it easy to play PC games on your HDTV, another popular trend that's only going to get bigger in 2013.

 

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