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Security vendor demonstrates hack of US e-voting machine

Grant Gross | Nov. 8, 2016
Other election security experts suggest the hack is nothing new

Some states have tamper seals on e-voting machines in an effort to discourage on-site hacking, but poll workers may not realize the potential problems if the seal is broken, Ryan Smith said. Cylance's video is intended to show them, he said.

Still, the potential uses of the Cylance hack are limited, said Douglas Jones, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa. The major concern during this election has been hacking from Russians or other overseas hackers, and the Cylance hack depends on physical access to each machine, he noted.

The Cylance hack would be "devastating if the adversary we were concerned about was a local political machine intent on controlling, perhaps, a county," Jones said by email.

Even such a local hack might require a conspiracy involving several people, with the possibility of someone leaking the plans, he added.

"There may be such corrupt political machines, and we ought to phase out these voting machines to prevent their abuse, but it's not the big news story of this election," Jones said. "This hack is irrelevant to concerns about Vladimir Putin trying to control the presidential election."

 

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