Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Proposal for altered data retention law is still unlawful, Dutch DPA says

Loek Essers | Feb. 17, 2015
The Dutch government's proposed revision of the country's data retention law is not enough to bring it into compliance with a recent European Union court ruling, the Dutch privacy watchdog said Monday.

The DPA's opinion is one of several that will have to be taken into account, said a spokesman for the Dutch government, who added that the government will comment on every suggestion in detail when the bill is submitted to the Parliament.

A DPA spokeswoman said the bill could still be altered before it will be discussed in parliament based on the advice.

Although the government has refused to annul the law, others are seeking to force its hand. On Wednesday, the District Court of the Hague is scheduled to hear a legal challenge to it, filed by a broad coalition of organizations who want the law invalidated because it violates fundamental privacy rights.

Other data retention laws in EU countries have already been ruled unconstitutional, In Austria for instance, the local law was invalidated in the wake of the CJEU ruling. In Germany, the local data retention law was ruled unconstitutional in 2010, long before the ruling.

In Sweden though, the government is looking to maintain a data retention obligation for telecommunication data on much the same grounds as in the Netherlands.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.