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Intel President James on wearable tech, Microsoft partnership

Agam Shah | Sept. 11, 2013
James is laying the groundwork for Quark chips to succeed in areas such as eye wear, personalized medicine and cloud services.

James: No, no, Intel and low power are not a question mark. We have lots of low-power products. It's not a question at all. May be that was five years ago. If you look... at Haswell 22-nanometer, that product is a four-watt product with Core i5 performance and Core i5-level graphics in fanless [devices]. That's the most [power-efficient] product ever built, anywhere.

IDGNS: Are you offering licensing or customizing Quark chips for third parties?

James: What we are offering is the ability to connect their intellectual property around ours. We also are offering fully designed products as well. It's a broad range that we're going to offer to customers in this category.

IDGNS: Intel is looking beyond Windows and moving to Android and Chrome for tablets and PCs. How is your relationship with Microsoft?

James: Our relationship with Microsoft is as good as ever. They are going to participate in IDF and you will hear from them about what's going on with Windows 8.1. I think it's just a matter of balance. Microsoft is not the only client operating system anymore. The same way for years and years Microsoft balanced between Intel and AMD, we're in the same situation now. Our customers want choice, and we offer choice.

IDGNS: What's the next big thing for Intel?

James: Integrated computing is the next big thing, I think it is the future of what we are going to do. It's not going to be necessarily about this device or that device, it's going to be about what problems we solve through computation. The final barriers, the things we don't understand, and what does it mean to have a mesh network of connected devices with cloud services and how does it change what we think about. That's the final frontier.

IDGNS: How important is your software background in leading a company that is traditionally focused on chips?

James: It's actually more useful than people would imagine. It's very relevant to the level of integrated platforms that we see people starting to build, even the way PCs are built now, servers, different workloads, what happens in the cloud. More so than ever on a forward-looking basis, the way computing is developing is going to be about the application, the workload, the right kind of compute for the right kind of task. The other thing is building system-on-chips and products today is very software oriented.

IDGNS: What is Intel's direction in chip development?

James: The direction for us is to continue with "tick-tock" for the microarchitecture, but to consider how to do derivatives... using the system-on-chip methodology.

 

 

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