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Global music revenues grow for first time since 1999 thanks to services such as Apple's iTunes

Ashleigh Allsopp | March 1, 2013
Recorded music industry revenues have grown for the first time in 13 years thanks to digital download services such as Apple's iTunes, according to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI).

Recorded music industry revenues have grown for the first time in 13 years thanks to digital download services such as Apple's iTunes, according to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI).

The IFPI's Digital Music Report 2013, which was published on 26 February, revealed that global recorded music revenues rose 0.3 per cent in 2012 to $16.5 billion, boosted by downloads, subscription and other channels. This represents the first year of industry growth since 1999.

Digital revenues were up 9 per cent in 2012, and IFPI says that most major digital revenue streams, namely downloads, subscription and advertising-supported, are on the rise. Digital revenues now account for 34 per cent of global industry revenues, while download sales represent around 70 per cent of overall digital music revenues.

The increase could in part be due to the global expansion for digital retailers who's major international services now reach more than 100 countries, compared with 23 at the beginning of 2011.

"It is hard to remember a year for the recording industry that has begun with such a palpable buzz in the air," said chief executive of IFPI Frances Moore. "These are hard-won successes for an industry that has innovated, battled and transformed itself over a decade. They show how the music industry has adapted to the internet world, learned how to meet the needs of consumers and monetised the digital marketplace."

Apple's iTunes, which is available in 119 countries, sold its 25 billionth song earlier this month, and is the number one digital music provider in many countries.

IFPI's report notes that unfair competition from unlicensed music services remains a barrier to further growth for music sales. The company estimates that 32 per cent of all internet users still regularly access unlicensed sites.

"Our markets remain rigged by illegal free music," said Moore. "This is a problem governments have a critical role to play, in particular by requiring more cooperation from advertisers, search engines, ISPs and other intermediaries. These companies' activities have a decisive influence in shaping a legitimate digital music business."

However, 57 per cent of those who use unlicensed services have that "there are good services available for legally accessing digital music," according to research by Ipsos MediaCT across nine markets in four continents.

Consumer satisfaction with licensed music services appears to be high, with 77 per cent of users of such services rating them as excellent, very good or fairly good. A total of 62 per cent of internet users in Ipsos MediaCT's research have used a licensed digital music service in the past six months. Among consumers aged 16-24, this figure increases to 81 per cent.

 

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