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Facebook, Google, Twitter, Woz, Trump, McAfee, Snowden, and more take sides on Apple vs. the FBI

Oscar Raymundo | Feb. 22, 2016
Tech leaders and politicians debate Apple's fight against the FBI in the court of public opinion.

Mark Cuban

The entrepreneur published his take on Business Insider commending Apple for doing the “exact right thing.”

“While the FBI is attempting to be very clear that this is a one-off request, there is no chance that it is,” Cuban wrote. “This will not be the last horrific event whose possible resolution could be on a smartphone. There will be many government agencies that many times in the future will point to Apple’s compliance as a precedent. Once this happens, we all roll down that slippery slope of lost privacy together.”

“If you think it’s bad that we can’t crack the encryption of terrorists, it is far worse when those who would terrorize us can use advanced tools to monitor our unencrypted conversations to plan their acts of terror.”

“If you think it’s bad that we can’t crack the encryption of terrorists, it is far worse when those who would terrorize us can use advanced tools to monitor our unencrypted conversations to plan their acts of terror.”

Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR)

Sen. Cotton issued a statement criticizing Apple for choosing to “protect a dead ISIS terrorist’s p‎rivacy over the security of the American people.”

The Senator believes that creating a backdoor is not just about preventing terrorism, but that they could also be used by authorities to fight other crimes. Talk about a slippery slope...

According to Sen. Cotton, the fact that Apple is fighting the court order explains why it’s quickly becoming the “company of choice for terrorists, drug dealers, and sexual predators of all sorts.”

Marco Rubio

The Republican presidential candidate believes that Apple should “voluntarily comply” to the court order because being a “good corporate citizen is important,” however he admits that this is a complicated issue.

“If we passed a law that required Apple and these companies to create a backdoor, one, criminals could figure that out and use it against you,” Rubio said on CNN. “And number two, there’s already encrypted software that already exists, not only now but in the future created in other countries. We would not be able to stop that, so there would still be encryption capabilities—they just wouldn’t be American encryption capabilities.”

“We’re going to have to figure out a way forward working with Silicon Valley and the tech industry on this. There has to be a way to deal with with this issue that continues to protect the privacy of Americans but creates some process by which law-enforcement intelligence agencies could access encrypted information. I don’t have a magic solution for it today—it’s a complicated new issue.”

Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)

Sen. Feinstein from California went on PBS NewsHour and argued that Apple should “produce the information” to the FBI based on a “probable cause warrant.” Sen. Feinstein also argued that the iPhone in question was owned by the San Bernardino County, which has given its permission. If Apple denies the request, Sen. Feinstein, the vice chair of the Senate intelligence committee, said she would draft a bill to change the laws and force Apple into compliance.

 

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