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China leads world in support for the 'connected home'

Brian Karlovsky | June 25, 2014
China could lead the world in adoption of the Internet of Things and the connected home after a global survey found strong support for the emerging technologies.

China could lead the world in adoption of the Internet of Things and the connected home after a global survey found strong support for the emerging technologies.

Network security firm, Fortinet, has released the results of a global survey that probes home owners about key issues pertaining to the Internet of Things (IoT).

The survey: 'Internet of Things: Connected Home,' gives a global perspective about the Internet of Things, what security and privacy issues are in play, and what home owners are willing to do to enable it.

The survey was independently administered in eleven countries.

The report found a majority (61 per cent) of all respondents believed that the connected home - a home in which household appliances and home electronics are seamlessly connected to the Internet - is 'extremely likely' to become a reality in the next five years.

China led the world in this category with more than 84 per cent affirming support.

In Australia, 53 per cent said that the connected home was extremely likely to happen in the next five years.

Fortinet A/NZ director of engineering, Gary Gardiner, said the battle for the Internet of Things had just begun.

"According to industry research firm IDC, the IoT market is expected to hit $7.1 trillion by 2020," he said.

"The ultimate winners of the IoT connected home will come down to those vendors who can provide a balance of security and privacy vis-à-vis price and functionality."

However, homeowners are concerned about data breaches.

A majority of all respondents voiced their concern that a connected appliance could result in a data breach or exposure of sensitive, personal information.

Globally, 69 per cent said that they were either "extremely concerned" or "somewhat concerned" about this issue.

Sixty-five percent of Australian respondents said that they were "extremely concerned" or "somewhat concerned."

When asked about the privacy of collected data, a majority of global respondents stated, "privacy is important to me, and I do not trust how this type of data may be used."

India led the world with this response at 63 per cent.

Sixty per cent in Australia also agreed with this statement.

Respondents were also asked how they would feel if a connected home device was secretly or anonymously collecting information about them and sharing it with others.

Most (62 per cent) answered "completely violated and extremely angry to the point where I would take action."

The strongest responses came from South Africa, Malaysia and the United States.

Sixty per cent of Australians also agreed with this statement.

Users are demanding control over who can access collected data, according to the survey.

When asked who should have access to the data collected by a connected home appliance, 66 per cent stated that only themselves or those to whom they give permission should have this information.

 

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