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Booq Mamba Courier: A little more style than substance

Amber Bouman | Jan. 27, 2014
Most Booq bags have a few things in common--most notably a serpent-inspired moniker, and more often than not, an unusual shape and design. This makes the Mamba Courier a bit of an anomaly for Booq, as it features a fairly standard, straightforward messenger design and eschews the 1680 denier ballistic nylon for a natural fiber material, jute.

Most Booq bags have a few things in common — most notably a serpent-inspired moniker, and more often than not, an unusual shape and design. This makes the Mamba Courier a bit of an anomaly for Booq, as it features a fairly standard, straightforward messenger design and eschews the 1680 denier ballistic nylon for a natural fiber material, jute.

The Mamba Courier is available in three colors, black, sand, and grey, and three sizes, 11 inch, 13 inch, or 15 inch; with the 11 inch style resembling more vertically oriented bags such as Ogio's Covert and the 13 and 15 inch messengers featuring the more expected horizontal design. The only other member of the Mamba line, the Daypack, is constructed from the same jute fiber and has an unadorned backpack design.

The 15" Mamba Courier that I tested came in black, with a deep red nylon interior. The Courier weighs about 2.3 pounds when empty, and measures 16.7" x 12.8" x 4.4" — I had zero problems sliding either my 13" ultrabook, or a 15" Macbook Pro into the designated, padded laptop sleeve.

The fiber material is waterproof and organically dyed. The overall design of the bag is clean and simple throughout: There are no pockets or pouches on the outside of the bag, save for the rear slip pocket (which also has a smaller pouch inside, ideal for smart phones or bus passes).

The front flap of the bag latches into place using hooks slid through loops — this is quite possibly my least favorite method of securing a bag, as it means I have to stop what I'm doing, reach down and guide the hook back out through the loop in order to access the contents of my bag. While I much prefer clasps and buckles, I will say that the hook method used here was quite effective in securing the front flap of my bag.

However, and this struck me as odd after I'd been using the bag for a few weeks, it's a little strange to even have a front flap on this bag — both the main compartment and the compartment on the front panel are secured with zippers, so the flap is simply one more barrier between you and your stuff. It does however, serve a higher purpose, and that is to make the handle useful.

While the Mamba Courier has a shoulder strap, which cannot be detached, it also — like most bags — has a handle. A handle that is made entirely useless if you do not secure the front flap of your bag down, as the handle itself is sewn into the front flap, not the top of the main compartment. That was a minor frustration.

 

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