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After a lapse, Intel looks to catch up with Moore's Law again

Agam Shah | Nov. 25, 2015
Aims to achieve scaling and cost savings with upcoming 10-nanometer and 7-nm processes.

"There is an increase in cost of research and development, but it's not going to be the thing that stops us from pursuing Moore's Law," Holt said.

Intel already has the most advanced manufacturing capabilities. Holt believes the company's manufacturing will remain a big advantage over rivals, making the money spent on it worthwhile.

In addition, the research pipeline is full of technologies that could advance computing and chip making. Intel's future mobile chips may have some components based on gallium nitride (GaN), which is considered a faster and more power-efficient alternative to silicon. Gallium nitride belongs to a family of exotic III-V materials, based on elements from the third and fifth columns of the periodic table.

Nanowires and new forms of memory like RRAM (resistive random access memory) and spintronics are also being researched, and could help scale down chips. Researchers are also looking beyond today's PCs and servers to quantum computers, which function differently than today's computers and could bring profound changes to chip manufacturing.

Some technologies are researched for decades and may not come to fruition, but nevertheless add to the knowledge necessary to advance computing, Holt noted.

"The future is quite robust," Holt said.

 

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