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Windows XP's user share plunge not real, just a data adjustment

Gregg Keizer | Nov. 6, 2014
Net Applications says XP dropped like a stone because the company yanked some Chinese websites from its tallies.

windows xp pc

The Internet metrics company that claimed Windows XP's user share plummeted by a record amount last month said Tuesday that it had struck several Chinese websites from its tallies, causing the dramatic decline.

Net Applications argued that its estimates are now "more accurate."

The California company's data, which is widely used by the media to track the ups and downs of browsers and operating systems, had reported October's numbers on Saturday. According to its estimates, Windows XP's user share had plunged a record 6.7 percentage points last month, while Windows 8 had soared by 4.5 points, also a record.

On Monday, the firm acknowledged a problem with the data. "We are still researching, but it does appear to be an anomaly," said Vince Vizzaccaro, head of marketing for Net Applications, in an email reply to questions over the weekend about the validity of the Windows XP and Windows 8 changes.

On Tuesday, Net Applications explained why Windows' XP's user share had fallen off the proverbial cliff.

"This drop was primarily caused by a major change in the network of sites we have in China," the company said in a statement. "A group of large Chinese publishers with a very large number of visitors per day had audiences heavily skewed towards Windows XP (nearly 100% XP). In researching the nature of the sites, we determined they were not appropriate for our network. We removed those publishers ourselves, which caused the shift since Chinese traffic is weighted higher due to lower coverage."

Net Applications weights website visitor tallies by country using estimates of each nation's online population, a way to account for markets where it has little actual data, and balance those against countries where it has considerable amounts of information. Because Net Applications collects significantly less data from China, for example, than it does from the U.S., each visitor from China is "worth" more to the result than one from the United States.

Net Applications did not say why the sites it yanked were suddenly "not appropriate" after they had been used to calculate user share previously. And in a follow-up email, Vizzaccaro declined to describe or name the Chinese sites that affected the data. However, he did say that Net Applications drops sites for several reasons, including "gaming" its analytics and receiving traffic from bots, browser toolbars or other automated page-view generators.

The company argued that by scrubbing out the Chinese websites' tallies, the result is a better picture of the percentages of the world's personal computers that run Windows XP and other operating systems. "The current data set is more accurate than in the past due to this," Net Applications said.

 

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