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Windows 7 holdouts: Why diehard users refuse to move to Windows 10

Ian Paul | July 30, 2015
Rejoice, Windows fans. Windows 10 is finally here and it's chock full of fancy new features like Cortana, Task View, windowed modern UI apps, and the return of the Start menu. But despite the excitement--and the free upgrade for Windows 7 and 8.1 users--not everyone is willing to make the jump to Microsoft's latest and greatest operating system.

windows 7 default desktop
Credit: Toasty Tech

Rejoice, Windows fans. Windows 10 is finally here and it's chock full of fancy new features like Cortana, Task View, windowed modern UI apps, and the return of the Start menu. But despite the excitement--and the free upgrade for Windows 7 and 8.1 users--not everyone is willing to make the jump to Microsoft's latest and greatest operating system.

Last week, we asked for input from anyone who was planning to pass on the Windows 10 upgrade. After culling through a ton of email, website and Facebook comments, as well as an active thread on Sevenforums.com, we talked to many Windows 7 and 8.1 users who won't be joining the Windows 10 party.

Why? For some, the move to Windows 10 would mean losing key functionality or legacy software.

For others, it comes down to the old axiom of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." Microsoft is no longer delivering feature updates to Windows 7, but will continue to support the operating system with security patches until 2020. Windows 8.1 mainstream support ends in 2018.

But with Windows 10, there is something that goes much deeper than a preference for older systems versus the look and feel of the new OS. Many users simply don't trust Microsoft's new way of doing business, or are wary of what the switch to Windows 10 means. For example, there are concerns about the recently discovered forced updates for home users, and fears of a potential subscription model for Windows.

Read on to discover why everyday users like you and me are deciding to skip the Windows 10 upgrade party, straight from their own mouths.

It's fine the way it is

If you ask me--and a lot of other PCWorld writers--Windows 10 is a great OS and well worth the upgrade. But just as we saw with Windows XP users last year, there's a cadre of Windows 7 and 8.1 users who don't see the need to move on. Why mess with something that's stable and working perfectly, after all?

"I work full time and want the home IT world to be as trouble free as possible," says Dan Yurman, a project manager based in Ohio. "I do not want my OS experience to be a high wire act. The OS should be dull, unexciting, and just do the job of making sure the hardware can talk to the applications and vice versa." Yurman's plan is to bring Windows 10 into his life as the three PCs in his home need to be replaced. He had originally hoped to move one laptop to Windows 10, but the current upgrade snafu surrounding Nvidia GeForce drivers has him thinking twice.

 

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