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Windows 10: Fact vs. fiction

Woody Leonhard | July 28, 2015
It's a few days before Windows 10 is officially slated to drop, and still, confusion abounds. Worse, many fallacies regarding Microsoft's plans around upgrades and support for Win10 remain in circulation, despite efforts to dispel them.

Fiction: Windows 10 requires a Microsoft account to install, use, or manage

Another common misconception is that Microsoft requires users have a Microsoft account to install, use, or manage Windows 10. In fact, local accounts will work for any normal Windows 10 activity, although you need to provide a Microsoft account in the obvious places (for example, to get mail), with Cortana, and to sync Edge.

Fact: If your tablet runs Windows RT, you're screwed

Microsoft has announced it will release a new version of Windows RT, called Windows RT 3, in September. If anybody's expecting it to look anything like Windows 10, you're sorely mistaken. If you bought the original Surface or Surface RT, you're out of luck. Microsoft sold folks an obsolete bucket of bolts that, sad to say, deserves to die. Compare that with the Chromebook, which is still chugging along.

Fiction: Microsoft pulled Windows Media Player from Windows 10

One word here seems to be tripping up folks. What Microsoft has pulled is Windows Media Center, which is a horse of a completely different color. If you're thinking of upgrading your Windows Media Center machine to Windows 10, you're better off retiring it and buying something that actually works like a media center. WMP is still there, although I wonder why anybody would use it, with great free alternatives like VLC readily available.

Fiction: Windows 10 is a buggy mess

In my experience, Windows 10 build 10240 (and thus, presumably, the final version) is quite stable and reasonably fast, and it works very well. There are anomalies -- taskbar icons disappear, some characters don't show up, you can't change the picture for the Lock Screen, lots of settings are undocumented -- and entire waves of features aren't built yet. But for day-to-day operation, Win10 works fine.

Fact: The current crop of "universal" apps is an electronic wasteland

Microsoft has built some outstanding universal apps on the WinRT foundation, including the Office trilogy, Edge, Cortana, and several lesser apps, such as the Mail/Calendar twins, Solitaire, OneNote, and the Store. But other software developers have, by and large, ignored the WinRT/universal shtick. You have to wonder why Microsoft itself wasn't able to get a universal OneDrive or Skype app going in time for July 29. Even Rovio has given a pass on Angry Birds 2 for the universal platform. Some games are coming (such as Rise of the Tomb Raider), but don't expect a big crop of apps for the universal side of Windows 10 (and, presumably, Windows 10 Mobile) any time soon.

Fiction: Microsoft wants to control us by forcing us to go to Windows 10

I hear variations on this theme all the time, and it's tinfoil-hat hooey. Microsoft is shifting to a different way of making money with Windows. Along the way, it's trying out a lot of moves to reinvigorate the aging cash cow. Total world domination isn't one of the options. And, no, the company isn't going to charge you rent for Windows 10, though it took seven months to say so, in writing.

 

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