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Windows 10: Fact vs. fiction

Woody Leonhard | July 28, 2015
It's a few days before Windows 10 is officially slated to drop, and still, confusion abounds. Worse, many fallacies regarding Microsoft's plans around upgrades and support for Win10 remain in circulation, despite efforts to dispel them.

Windows 10: Fact vs. fiction
Credit: Wikimedia

It's a few days before Windows 10 is officially slated to drop, and still, confusion abounds. Worse, many fallacies regarding Microsoft's plans around upgrades and support for Win10 remain in circulation, despite efforts to dispel them.

Here at InfoWorld, we've been tracking Windows 10's progress very closely, reporting the evolving technical details with each successive build in our popular "Where Windows 10 stands right now" report. We've also kept a close eye on the details beyond the bits, reporting on the common misconceptions around Windows 10 licensing, upgrade paths, and updates. If you haven't already read that article, you may want to give it a gander. Many of the fallacies we pointed out six weeks ago are still as fallacious today -- and you'll hear them repeated as fact by people who should know better.

Here, with Windows 10 nearing the finish line, we once again cut through the fictions to give you the true dirt -- and one juicy conjecture -- about Windows 10, in hopes of helping you make the right decisions regarding Microsoft's latest Windows release when it officially lands July 29.

Conjecture: Windows Insiders already have the "final" version of Windows 10

Give or take a few last-minute patches, members of the Windows Insider program may already have what will be the final version of Win10. Build 10240, with applied patches, has all the hallmarks of a first final "general availability" version.

If you're in the Insider program, either Fast or Slow ring, and your computer's been connected to the Internet recently, you've already upgraded, automatically, to the Windows 10 that's likely headed out on July 29. No, I can't prove it. But all the tea leaves point in that direction. Don't be surprised if Terry Myerson announces on July 29 that Insiders are already running the "real" Windows 10 -- and have been running it for a couple of weeks. Everyone else can get a feel for the likely "final" Windows 10, build 10240, by checking out our ongoing Windows 10 beta coverage at "Where Windows stands right now."

Fact: Windows 10 has a 10-year support cycle

Like Windows Vista, Win7, and Win8 before it, Windows 10 has a 10-year support cycle. In fact, we're getting a few extra months for free: According to the Windows Lifecycle fact sheet, mainstream support ends Oct. 13, 2020, and extended support ends Oct. 14, 2025. Of course, if your sound card manufacturer, say, stops supporting Windows 10, you're out of luck.

I have no idea where Microsoft's statement about covering Windows 10 "for the supported lifetime of the device" came from. It sounds like legalese that was used to waffle around the topic for seven frustrating months. Microsoft's publication of the Lifecycle fact sheet shows that Windows 10 will be supported like any other version of Windows. (XP's dates were a little different because of SP2.)

 

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