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Vision-correcting display nixes your need for eyeglasses

Sharon Gaudin | Aug. 1, 2014
Your reading glasses will be so yesterday with UC Berkeley's new technology.

The university said that the hardware setup adds a printed pinhole screen sandwiched between two layers of clear plastic to an iPod display to enhance image sharpness. The tiny pinholes are 75 micrometers each and spaced 390 micrometers apart.

The algorithm, which was developed at Berkeley, it works by altering the intensity of each direction of light that emanates from a single pixel in an image based upon a user's specific visual impairment, the university reported. The light then passes through the pinhole array in a way that allows the user to see a sharp image.

Huang, who has not yet talked with computer monitor or smartphone and tablet manufacturers about the research, noted that the display technology could be developed into a thin screen protector.

"The current version is still quite fragile," he added. "It requires precise calibration between the eye and the display and it took some time to find the sweet spot for my own eye. But remember that Amazon just announced the Fire Phone with the super fancy dynamic perspective to track your eye. This technology can solve my problem ... so I'm pretty optimistic about the overall progress."

However, he said that at this point in their work, the technology wouldn't work on a shared display such as a television screen.

"In the future, we also hope to extend this application to multi-way correction on a shared display, so users with different visual problems can view the same screen and see a sharp image," he said.

 

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