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The next phase of mobility

Divina Paredes | July 8, 2014
Finance executives discuss how the uptake of cloud services and rise of mobile devices are creating a 24x7 customer-driven environment. They share insights on how they are working through these rapid changes, while preparing for the next business technology trend, at a recent CIO roundtable held in conjunction with Samsung.

Finance executives say the uptake of cloud services and rise of mobile devices are creating a 24x7 customer-driven environment.

They share insights on how they are working through these rapid changes, while preparing for the next business technology trend, at a recent CIO roundtable held in conjunction with Samsung.

Here are excerpts from the discussion:

What does mobile mean for your organisation?

Deane Johns, New Zealand Association of Credit Unions (NZACU): Mobile is about convenience for our members, but also about trying to building growth and growth in memberships, as well.

Richard Horton, Fidelity Life: Mobility is all about providing a faster, a more convenient way to interact with our external customers.

Damon Murfitt, NZ Funds Management: Mobility is two-fold for us. One is security: it's the expectation that I can just turn up to work and use a device, and how do we do that?. The other side is we are trying to build great client relationships, and the expectation out there is they will be able to interact with our services over mobile devices. So it's how do we build on that, deliver it; what does it look like?

Lincoln Watson, New Zealand Guardian Trust: Our main job at the moment is to merge the operations of two businesses, however to support growth, the other part of my role is to write and deliver our digital strategy. Mobility for us is really about enablement for our clients and advisors, absolutely, but also about transforming our business.

Miles Fordyce, New Zealand Post: The next phase of mobility for me is around Identity. It's around helping people to define their personal identity and their business identity; and how mobility really defines our overall direction, how others see us, how we want to interact going forward.

Peter Chisnall, MasterCard, New Zealand: We have just released our online digital wallet platform into the market, a product called MasterPass, a convenient online payment form effectively a competitor to other digital wallet solutions such as PayPal. The next step in this journey of digital payments convergence is for us is to enable that same piece of technology to allow people to purchase in person at point of sale, via mobile devices.

Waka Donnelly, AIG Insurance: One of our key objectives here at AIG is how we enhance our mobile workforce and enable the delivery of information in a secure manner through approved devices and managed client software.

AIG NZ is part of a global End User Technology initiative, one of the main drivers is to ensure we build a stable mobile platform as part of our service offering to the customer.

Stuart Pattison, AIA New Zealand: Mobility from a life insurance perspective means providing the advisers with information to allow them to place the policy easily and for that to be interactive. It's about getting data to them so that they can complete those transactions. In terms of my involvement in big data, I'm interested in mobility of capturing data and feeding it back so you can analyse trends and patterns to move towards a more customer centric, rather than an information centric offering.

 

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