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The geekiest stuff we saw at CES 2013

Nick Mediati, Albert Filice | Jan. 14, 2013
For techies like ourselves, CES is the Greatest Show on Earth (P.T. Barnum, eat your heart out). So trust us when we tell you these are the things from CES that you don't want to miss. You'll thank us later.

For techies like ourselves, CES is the Greatest Show on Earth (P.T. Barnum, eat your heart out). So trust us when we tell you these are the things from CES that you don't want to miss. You'll thank us later.

mRobo shows off dance moves that far surpass my own

If you don't have a problem with a robot showing you up with its perfect rhythm and choreography, then you should really enjoy the mRobo. It's a speaker...that's really a robot...that can really dance. You aren't stuck to a couple bland routines, either: You can program it to do whatever moves you want it to, as well as download other dance routines from other mRobo owners.

It will be available for $199 and is expected to come out sometime later this year.

Old console becomes new gadget

If you long for the days of playing Super Nintendo with your face plastered to the TV screen, you'll love the SupaBoy. It's an actual Super Nintendo chipset crammed into a handheld design that resembles an oversized SNES controller, and it'll even work with your old game cartridges. I features an AV out port, so you can plug it into your TV and attach two controllers and use it as full-fledged Super Nintendo. You can pick one up right now for around $80.

Displair gives you a touchscreen out of thin air

One thing that stood out at CES was the Displair touchscreen, which features a screen made up of tiny water droplets. These water droplets are shot into the air by a continuous stream of compressed air to create a sheet onto which a projector can display an image. The cool part is that the image that appears to float in front of you is responsive to your touch. The image isn't perfect ,though, and gets noticeably more blurry the higher up you look. The Displair costs $10,000, so it might only make sense in lobbies or spaces where lots of people can enjoy it.

Winbot won't complain about cleaning windows

Just like vacuuming, cleaning windows has never been an enjoyable task. However, the great minds of the world have created robots specifically to combat dirt and dust, and our distaste for the time-consuming task of cleaning it up. Ecovacs brings us the Winbot 7, a window-washing bot that uses suction to stick to your windows while it cleans them completely. It can get in all the hard-to-reach, high-up spots, or just take the chore out of cleaning large panes.

Winbot 7 is set to go on sale in the spring, and will be priced between $299 and $399, so you may want to consider the cost of a bottle of Windex and 20 minutes of your time first.

 

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