Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Tethering tutorial: How to use your Android smartphone as a modem

Tony Ibrahim | Aug. 12, 2014
Knowing how to share your smartphone's Internet connection can get you out of sticky situations. All Android smartphones can generate a wireless Wi-Fi hotspot that your tablet, notebook or other device can access to surf the web. Enabling this feature is easily done provided you account for the basics.

Plugging an Android smartphone into a Windows notebook/PC for the first time will trigger the installation of drivers. Wait for this to finish and then, on your smartphone, open the Settings menu. Under the 'Wireless and networks' heading, select Tethering and mobile hotspot and then select USB tethering.

The network icon in the taskbar should display a wired connection when it is successful.

Simply uncheck USB tethering from your Android smartphone when you have finished tethering.

Apple OS X

Android does not support tethering for Apple's OS X platform by default; however, third party applications make USB tethering possible between the two disparate platforms.

Software engineer Joshua Wise has cooked up a fix with the USB tethering driver HoRNDIS (pronounced "horrendous"). HoRNDIS is one such driver available as a free download and, based on our experiences, it works well.

Firstly download the version of HoRNDIS suitable for your Apple computer from Wise's website. Instal the .pkg and follow the typical installation prompts. We recommend restarting your computer once the installation is complete.

Then plug in your Android smartphone using the USB cable. Open Settings > More > (under the Wireless and networks menu) Tethering and mobile hotspot and then select USB tethering.

Now when you jump onto your Mac and select System preferences > Network, you should see your smartphone at the top of the connections. Ensure Wi-Fi is disabled and begin surfing the Internet.

We tested HoRNDIS with a Motorola Moto G (4G) and an LG G3. It worked without fail on both smartphones.

4. Enjoy surfing the Internet

Ensure you have a large data quota to work with, as tethering uses much more data than browsing the Web on your smartphone does. If you regularly use tethering, we suggest a data allowance of at least 2GB a month.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.