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Startup Capriza scores US$27M to Zapp legacy apps into mobile ones

Bob Brown | Oct. 31, 2014
Capriza, a startup that helps enterprises convert their legacy apps into mobile- and cloud-based ones, Thursday announced it has racked up an additional $27 million in venture funding.

Capriza, a startup that helps enterprises convert their legacy apps into mobile- and cloud-based ones, Thursday announced it has racked up an additional $27 million in venture funding. That should be enough to help Capriza scale its business on the marketing and sales side, and maybe even have enough left over to afford a drummer and bassist to form a company band (more on that later...).

The Palo Alto firm, which started in 2011 and now employs an engineering-heavy staff of about 60 people, has raised a total of $50 million. The latest funding comes courtesy of existing investors Andreessen Horowitz and Charles River Ventures, with Tenaya Capital now joining the party as well. Harmony Partners and Allen & Co., have also chipped in on this round. 

One reason investors have faith in Capriza is that its founders previously were all top executives at Mercury Interactive, an enterprise management software company that HP bought for $4.5 billion in 2006

Capriza has been selling its software-as-a-service offering for about 10 months and now counts more than 100,000 end users, including at big name customers such as Brocade and DirecTV. A subset of the customers' employees use Capriza's Designer product to rework and extend existing apps, such as customer relationship management software from SAP as well as internally-designed custom apps, into what the company calls Zapps.

Zapps are lighter weight and cloud-backed versions of the original apps designed to work fast and simply for end users regardless of where they are, but often this means people in the field using iOS, Android and other smartphones and tablets. Capriza's formula allows for apps to be reworked for specific use cases, including for small and large groups (the product is licensed based on the number of enterprise users, not the number of apps deployed).

Capriza claims running Zapps is secure in large part because data is not stored on the mobile devices, and the company offers a slew of management and analytics tools for organizations to track how the mobilized apps are being used, how virtual machines are faring and more.

CTO and co-founder Oren Ariel took me through a demo of the product via screen sharing, during which he illustrated the dragging and dropping of only the most vital fields from the old apps to new mobilized ones that take advantage of web services, such as mapped addresses. Capriza customer DirecTV, he says, takes advantage of the mobile format to scan QR codes in the field, which eliminates mistakes from typing in information. End users get a "consistent, look and feel...mobile-first experience across any type of device," he says. But the apps also are rich, inheriting "years and years of business logic" from the original apps, and "injecting mobility in the right places in the business process," Ariel adds.

 

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