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Securing the nation

Hafizah Osman | Feb. 8, 2013
The Federal Government has slapped security on the frontline of IT agendas with its announcement of a new cyber security centre in Canberra and an additional $1.46 billion in funding for cyber security as part of a new national security blueprint.

The Federal Government has slapped security on the frontline of IT agendas with its announcement of a new cyber security centre in Canberra and an additional $1.46 billion in funding for cyber security as part of a new national security blueprint.

The move, boosting Australia's ability to protect against cyber-attacks, is part of the Strong and Secure: A Strategy for Australia's National Security plan, which named cyber security as one of three key areas of focus for Australian defence, intelligence agencies and law enforcement over the next five years.

Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, said cyber security incidents had increased 42 per cent over the past two years and the government will concentrate on the issue as part of the NBN rollout. The plan will be updated every five years.

The move was welcomed by the channel which underscored both growing opportunity within the security sector and its ongoing importance in the age of mobility, big data, BYOD and any number of data sensitive developments.

ASI Solutions director, Maree Lowe, said the government should embark on a massive education of businesses and individuals following the announcement of the policy.

"I don't think people have the big picture on why the government is focusing on cybercrime. Government needs to have a big push in educating on the implications of the future. The next thing following that is addressing budget issues."

Websense regional sales manager, Gerry Tucker, claimed the policy further stressed the importance of cyber security at a board and executive level.

Primary focus

He said as security continues to be the primary focus for organisations, it provides an opportunity for the channel to move into consultancy, integration, or service and implementation.

According to Tucker, end-users are beginning to see security solutions as a process buy instead of just a technology buy.

"End-users are not just looking for a piece of technology; they are looking for a security solution that integrates into all elements of their business. It is about working with partners and system integration houses that can take the technology into that broader and more complete solution."

Tucker advised resellers, who have yet to enter the security space, to partner with other businesses that have established a place within the security space if they do not intend on going into it by themselves.

These businesses, which have established themselves within security, will be able to plan out the most appropriate technologies for the resellers and ensure that they can provide sales, technical training, and services.

"There is definitely going to be more money spent in this area and it is going to be seen as a competitive differentiator from a channel perspective," he said.

 

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