Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Samsung's Galaxy Tab S shows innovation in short supply

Agam Shah | June 16, 2014
Samsung's Galaxy Tab has good hardware, but isn't a game-changing product

Meanwhile, Android tablets lag behind Apple's iPads in the transition to 64-bit chips and operating systems. The Tab S launched with 32-bit processors. Sixty-four-bit processors are expected to be in smartphones and tablets by year end. Google could announce a 64-bit version of the Android OS at its I/O conference later this month.

A 64-bit Tab S with the requisite amount of internal memory could have been more attractive to buyers, as it would have brought performance benefits, analysts said. Even without additional memory, a 64-bit chip could have caused some waves.

"It's nice to have it. It's a spec thing. You don't get benefits from 64-bit if you don't have more memory," O'Donnell said.

But in a competitive market, simply getting new products out the door matters a lot.

"At the end of the day I think the launch had more to do with getting in the market with yet another tablet before Apple revamps the current iPad models and possibly launches the rumored 12-inch version," Milanesi said.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.