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Reviewed: Falcon Northwest Mach V with Triple Titan X Cards rips the lid off our gaming tests

Gordon Mah Ung | April 7, 2015
Americans love stats. Who has the greatest batting average of all time? (Ty Cobb.) Who was in the most James Bond movies and how many times? (Roger Moore, with six.) Can a gaming PC really cost $9,683? (Bleep yes!).

Americans love stats. Who has the greatest batting average of all time? (Ty Cobb.) Who was in the most James Bond movies and how many times? (Roger Moore, with six.) Can a gaming PC really cost $9,683? (Bleep yes!).

Falcon Northwest, the company credited with creating the "gaming PC" category, thinks it has justification for the audacious price of its Mach V Icon2, and many might agree: It has three, count-'em, three of the fastest gaming GPUs on the planet inside of it. 

Yes, that's three of Nvidia's $1,000 GeForce Titan X cards running in Tri-SLI mode. One card alone is capable of playing most of today's most punishing games at 4K resolution, but only if you're willing to run at high settings instead of Ultra, Ultimate, or Uber, and you have a G-sync monitor that smooths out those occasional slower frame rates. 

Three Titan X cards: As fast as you'd expect

How fast are three Titan X cards? When I first received the rig I ran 3DMark's FireStrike Ultimate, which lets you compare results run at 4K resolution against Futuremark's massive database of results. The Mach V landed in the top 40. 

You might scoff at a result "only " in the 40s, but Futuremark's leader board includes machines overclocked using liquid nitrogen, liquid helium and all kinds of extreme-overclocking sports entries. To land in that esteemed company with a production machine is no small feat and easily puts the Mach V among the fastest gaming rigs in the world.

The Mach V isn't just about the Titan X cards, though. Falcon matches those three GPUs with Intel's 8-core Core i7-5960X, with a smooth little overclock to 4.3GHz. That's not the most aggressive overclock around, but it's respectable and stable. We had no issues with crashing during our time with the Mach V. 

There's also 32GB of G.Skill DDR4 buzzing along at 2,400MHz, a pair of Samsung 850 Pro drives in RAID 0, 1,500 watt Silverstone PSU, and even an optical drive for old-school use. That RAID configuration certainly surprised us, though. Sure, 2TB of fast SSD storage is good, but are we truly at the point where a hard drive isn't needed anymore? People's opinions will vary, but I'd still like to see a 6TB or even 10TB drive for backup use. 

This is all installed on an Asus Rampage V Extreme with USB 3.1 support. Yeah, we were excited about seeing USB 3.1 on this motherboard, but we had nothing to test it with. There are simply no USB 3.1 devices available yet. But hey, we're ready whenever it does actually appear, right?

The case itself is a custom-painted design built by Silverstone that flips the GPUs into a vertical position. This helps cooling by venting air out the top of the case rather than trying to exhaust it out the back. Falcon aids this effort by adding a massive fan below the cards to help blow air through the top. To keep the GPUs from super-heating the rest of the system, a baffle is also used to wall off the GPUs from the CPU.

 

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