Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Review: CyberPower Trinity Xtreme PC looks insane but is surprisingly upgradeable

Gordon Mah Ung | June 3, 2015
You know how your sandal-wearing, tablet-toting partner insists on organically grown, free-range, gluten-free water? Gamers are the same way about their rigs and their need for industry-standard parts. Proprietary? Might as well be a genetically modified flesh-eating tomato.

You know how your sandal-wearing, tablet-toting partner insists on organically grown, free-range, gluten-free water? Gamers are the same way about their rigs and their need for industry-standard parts. Proprietary? Might as well be a genetically modified flesh-eating tomato. 

Sure, proprietary gets you designs such as Apple's Mac Pro, but you're left high and dry when it's time to upgrade.

That won't happen with CyberPower's new Trinity Xtreme, which gives you a truly exotic look without the penalties.

cyberpower trinity xtreme front
GORDON MAH UNG. CyberPower's Trinity Xtreme may look like alien technology, but it's a PC.

What's inside

CyberPower sells several different versions of the Trinity. Its Trinity 100 runs on AMD APUs and rings in around the $1,000 mark. The Trinity 200 is the mid-range part with Intel's Haswell quad-core inside, while the unit you see here is dubbed the Trinity Xtreme. Like the Falcon Northwest Tiki it uses Asrock's X99 E-ITX/AC motherboard, which lets CyberPower shoehorn a six-core Core i7-5820K CPU inside. There are eight-core options, but the Core i7-5820K lets CyberPower put more cash toward the GPU. In our case, it's a GeForce GTX Titan X. You could argue that a GeForce GTX 980 Ti makes more fiscal sense now, but the Trinity Xtreme arrived right before the 980 Ti was released.

For storage there's a 2TB hard drive and a 250 GB Samsung 850 EVO SSD. It's all powered by an 850-watt Corsair CS-series PSU. 

cyberpower trinity xtreme inside2
GORDON MAH UNG. The magic of the Trinity Xtreme is its use of off-the-shelf components.

Remember, these are all off-the-shelf parts. What you're probably wondering is how it all fits in there.

Each of the pods, or "blades," as CyberPower calls them, store different components. The right pod holds the Mini ITX motherboard, CPU and radiator. The left unit holds the PSU and has enough space for two 3.5-inch hard drives. The top pod holds a standard GPU. In our case, again, it's a standard GeForce Titan X inside and it definitely looks like there's room for a dual-GPU card such as a Titan Z or an older GeForce GTX 690 card. Sorry Radeon R9 295X2, there's no place to put your radiator, but maybe give me a call when the fabled dual next-gen card shows up in this timeline.

For expansion, there's room in the Trinity Xtreme for another two 2.5-inch drives and another 3.5-inch drive. Believe it or not, there's actually room for a slimline optical drive between the two 3.5-inch drives. Our unit though didn't come with it. Perhaps CyberPower figured you couldn't play your fantasy of being a James Bond supervillain while burning a CD.

 

1  2  3  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.