Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Retina MacBook owners team up against Apple over display coating issue dubbed Staingate

Ashleigh Allsopp | July 20, 2015
Many Retina MacBook Pro owners have been complaining about an issue that is causing the anti-reflective display coating to wear off of their MacBook's screen, leaving what looks like a stain. Now dubbed Staingate, the issue has become so widespread that MacBook owners affected have created a website in a bid to team up against Apple and kick off a replacement or repair programme.

Many Retina MacBook Pro owners have been complaining about an issue that is causing the anti-reflective display coating to wear off of their MacBook's screen, leaving what looks like a stain. Now dubbed Staingate, the issue has become so widespread that MacBook owners affected have created a website in a bid to team up against Apple and kick off a replacement or repair programme.

What is Staingate?

Taking a closer look, Staingate is the term used to describe the issue that is causing MacBook Pro owners with Retina displays to wear off or peel, leaving what looks like large, ugly and obstructive stains across the screen.

According to those affected, the issue can begin as soon as seven months after the MacBook is purchased. "There is no clear pattern as to how it starts: some experience it in small spots around the edge, on other screens it appears in the middle as large patches.

On Staingate.org, there's a huge gallery of examples of the issue.

How to fix Staingate: Will Apple replace your screen?

Apple says that anyone suffering from Staingate should contact the Apple Support Centre, but if your Warranty or AppleCare has expired, you might be charged for the repair or replacement.

In fact, Apple is apparently classing the issue as cosmetic damage that is not covered by the warranty, and repairs can cost up to $800 (£512) with a three-month warranty.

Which is why affected customers have teamed up and created both a Facebook group and a website about the issue, as well as a petition on Change.org for a replacement or repair programme.

As of 15 July, there are more than 3,000 people who've reported that they're suffering from the Staingate issue, so we expect it won't be long before the petition meets its target 5,000 supporters. If you're suffering or know someone who is, we'd recommend signing the petition to help get the issue sorted quicker.

But how likely is Apple to listen? We think pretty likely if enough noise is made about it. We've been reporting for years about an issue with 2011 MacBook Pro graphics failures that Apple finally addressed with a repair programme in February this year, so we're confident that Apple will eventually listen to its customers about Staingate.

Plus, US law firm Whitfield Bryson & Mason has been in touch with the group on Facebook, which was the first step towards success for the aforementioned 2011 MacBook Pro graphics failures issue.

Let us know in the comments section below if you're also experiencing the Staingate issue. We'll update this article if we hear any more news from Apple or around the web.

 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.