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Quickflix to stream Game of Thrones hours after US broadcast

Campbell Simpson | April 16, 2013
Inks HBO deal, goes toe to toe with iTunes, Foxtel to broadcast show soon after US airing

Langsford also commented on the current and future status of Australia's national broadband infrastructure, crucial to the company's aspirations of delivering streaming video ubiquitously.

"It's very good, and that's both fixed broadband and wireless. It will only get better too - if NBN rolls out, then one day Quickflix will be streaming 3D movies.

"I spend a fair amount of time in the US. Australia's broadband infrastructure actually holds up very well. The average connection speed of Australian broadband customers is 4.5Mbps, which is more than sufficient to enjoy Quickflix's adaptive streaming of SD and HD movies and TV. Previously [US streaming giant] Netflix has cited its average customer speed was 1.5Mbps.

"70 per cent of Australians (in our major cities) can enjoy this access. Rural and regional Australia, where 30 per cent of the population reside has slower connection speeds - the NBN (or variation thereof!) promises high speed connection for this group, and will only improve connection speeds in the city."

He also told PC World that one central aspect preventing uptake of video-on-demand and streaming IPTV services - limited download quotas - was largely a thing of the past.

"What has held Australia back in the past has been onerous data caps. But these have lifted over the past two years, so now I can get 200 gigabytes, or in some cases unlimited access, for [around] $50 per month.

"Un-metering access is no longer an issue by and large because data caps have lifted considerably across the board. Someone on a 200gb plan can watch a lot of streamed movies and TV, and everything else they use their internet for."

 

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