Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Prism doesn't have CIOs in a panic — yet

Chris Kanaracus | June 18, 2013
But CIOs and other tech executives say the spying scandal underscores the need for strong corporate security measures

Platt also hinted at one potential benefit to CIOs resulting from the Prism revelations.

Security measures "cost money," he said. "Being able to point to the news that everybody's watching and say, 'that's what we're talking about,' that [simplifies] making business cases to executives."

The Prism scandal has shaken all of us, but perhaps mostly as individuals, according to Tony Söderlund, CIO at Salem Municipality in Sweden, which uses Google Apps.

To that end, CareFusion's Zill sees the potential for a post-Prism backlash against enterprises that use tracking tools, data mining, analytics and other technologies to profile customers, send targeted advertisements and ultimately, sell more products and services.

"I don't want to be tracked," Zill said, citing the "digital leash" companies try to place on consumers. "It's exhausting."

In the wake of Prism, companies "should be prepared to be very clear about how they use customer and prospect information," said analyst Curt Monash of Monash Research. "This news makes the general populace antsier about privacy."

"My general approach to privacy issues is that it's inevitable that information will be passed around," Monash added. The key for enterprises is to be "responsible in its use and be seen to be responsible," he said.

(With reporting from Mikael Ricknas in London).

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.