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Oracle customers 'concerned' about application support says Rimini Street

Antony Savvas | Oct. 3, 2014
Oracle customers have "concerns" about the company's software support strategy, according to rival software support company Rimini Street.

Oracle customers have "concerns" about the company's software support strategy, according to rival software support company Rimini Street.

Rimini Street questioned 140 IT and and IT procurement pros globally and found that the "leading concern" with Oracle's application strategy, was the "cost of prohibitive upgrades", cited by 58 percent of respondents.

The results from the modest survey were published as Oracle holds its mammoth Oracle OpenWorld user conference in San Francisco this week. Rimini offers potentially cheaper third party software support options for Oracle and SAP software than those two suppliers, although the two suppliers themselves dispute whether it meets the quality of their own support.

There is also ongoing legal action being taken by Oracle against Rimini Street in relation to its third party Oracle support offerings.

The survey also revealed that just five percent of respondents currently plan to license and migrate to Oracle's new cloud Fusion Applications. Furthermore, more than 70 percent of respondents reported that they are dissatisfied with the cost of Oracle's annual support.

David Rowe, senior VP and chief marketing officer at Rimini Street, said: "In the survey Oracle application customer respondents overwhelmingly expressed a desire to continue running their current, robust application releases.

"They also identified several primary Oracle application strategy concerns, including what they believe is an unclear future Oracle product roadmap, lack of a business case for a migration to Fusion Applications and cost-prohibitive upgrades."

Rimini Street said it conducted the survey to "better understand the priorities, needs and concerns of Oracle application customers", and how to address them, such as hybrid IT deployments and "the need for a more relevant, cost-effective support service model that does not require upgrades for at least 15 years".

Oracle declined to comment.

 

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