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Oculus announces new Touch hand-tracker and details first games for the consumer-edition Rift

Hayden Dingman | June 12, 2015
"So...when's the consumer version of the Rift coming?" I've been asking Oculus that question since the first time I strapped one over my eyes, and every time co-founder Nate Mitchell would give me a rueful shake of the head. "We don't know. It's coming."

"So...when's the consumer version of the Rift coming?" I've been asking Oculus that question since the first time I strapped one over my eyes, and every time co-founder Nate Mitchell would give me a rueful shake of the head. "We don't know. It's coming."

But we know: It's Q1 2016. And thus it's high time for Oculus to discuss what consumers will actually get their hands on next year bring to an end this long and winding road. It's a road that's seen VR turn from a novelty into an arms race, that's seen Oculus go from "easy frontrunner" to jockeying for position with Valve, that's seen the fledgling company bought by Facebook of all things.

It's been weird.

On Thursday, at an Oculus press conference in San Francisco, we got our first real details about the consumer version of Oculus Rift, informally known as "Consumer Rift."

The big news: a new control scheme designed for virtual reality: Oculus Touch. More on that later.

Sitting-down VR

Unlike Valve and HTC's Vive, the consumer version of the Rift features no wall-mounted IR base stations, no packed-in controllers. Instead, like the DK1 and DK2 models it's a mostly self-contained unit, with the addition of the key "Crescent Bay" prototype features — namely, built-in headphones with positional audio. And there's a new feature: The headphones are removable, rather than merely bending out of the way.

The DK2's positional-tracking camera also makes a return, though it looks quite a bit sleeker — and it apparently sits on a big stand on your desk, instead of on your monitor. Aiding the camera, the headset itself is now equipped with trackers all the way around, as seen on Crescent Bay, which will make a huge difference for those who've used DK2 — no more "I turned my head too far and the camera lost me" situations.

But the most important changes are presumably related to the Rift's screen — and we still haven't seen it. In the Consumer Rift announcement we were told it'll run dual displays totaling a 2160x1200 resolution at 90Hz — "maybe not the resolution you may one day want," said CEO Brendan Iribe, but he deemed it a good start. I'm most excited about a totally extraneous feature though: You can now adjust focus with a built-in dial instead of needing to swap out lenses. About time.

The Windows connection

Oculus also announced a partnership with Windows — both on the OS side and the hardware side. First of all, the Consumer Rift will work natively with Windows 10. That's a pretty huge deal, considering what a pain it is to set up the current DK2.

 

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