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Nokia's Lumia 1020 camera outshines its own Windows Phone 8

Matt Hamblen | July 12, 2013
Microsoft scrambled to make its OS work with 41-megapixel sensor in new Lumia smartphone

New features were added to Windows Phone code,such as improving the zoom in the platform's photo viewer, Belfiore added. He said other improvements were made, but did not elaborate.

The blog also claims that the 1020 can outshine a digital camera, even though it's a smartphone.

Shields contends in the blog that the 1020 is "both a phone camera and a camera phone," with the processing power of Windows Phone software that's unavailable for a DSLR camera. He notes that the Nokia PureView 808 smartphone running the Symbian OS also had a 41-megapixel sensor when released a year ago, but it didn't have the low-light capabilities of the Lumia 920 that are also in the 1020.

Shields also said the optical stabilization capability of the 920, carried to the 1020, represents a "really deep collaboration" with Microsoft.

Nokia would have put the 41-megapixel sensor used in the PureView 808 on a Windows Phone platform, but the OS wasn't ready at the time, Golvin said.

"Microsoft had to scramble to get Windows Phone ready for [41 megapixels], which says something about Microsoft's ability to respond to manufacturer innovation and to make sure the software platform can provide support for hardware innovation," Golvin said. "Nokia would have been much happier to originally release 41 megapixels as a Windows device instead of Symbian, but I don't think the Windows Phone software at the time could support it."

Golvin and other analysts laughed at the notion suggested by some on Twitter that the Lumia 1020 hardware would be great to have but running instead on Android. Nokia is already so closely linked to Windows Phone 8 that turning to Android would be complex and time consuming, they said.

"Nokia is really the only true success story that Microsoft has for Windows Phone, as much as the current position of Nokia can be called a success," said Jack Gold, an analyst at J. Gold Associates.

"It's becoming clear that the leverage Nokia hoped for by using Windows Phone never really came about, at least, not very much. Nokia doesn't really need to promote its Windows Phone roots since it doesn't offer that much leverage anymore," Gold added. "On the other hand, Microsoft really needs Nokia to succeed to prove that Windows Phone is a contender. Nokia can certainly get leverage out of Microsoft's marketing dollars, which is where they are going with joint campaigns."

 

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