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New modulation scheme said to be 'breakthrough' in network performance

John Cox | Dec. 18, 2013
MagnaCom's WAM boosts system gain, distance, efficiency; cuts costs, power.

"There are some huge claims here," says Earl Lum, founder of EJL Wireless, a market research firm that focuses on microwave backhaul, cellular base station, and related markets. "They're not going into exactly how they're doing this, so it's really tough to say that this technology is really working."

Lum, who originally worked as an RF design engineer before switching to wireless industry equities research on Wall Street, elaborated on two of those claims: WAM's greater distance and its improved spectral efficiency.

"Usually as you go higher in modulation, the distance shrinks: it's inversely proportional," he explains. "So the 400 percent increase in distance is significant. If they can compensate and still get high spectral efficiency and keep the distance long, that's what everyone is trying to have."

The spectrum savings of up to 50 percent is important, too. "You might be able to double the amount of channels compared to what you have now," Lum says. "If you can cram more channels into that same spectrum, you don't have to buy more [spectrum] licenses. That's significant in terms of how many bits-per-hertz you can realize. But, again, they haven't specified how they do this."

According to MagnaCom, WAM uses some kind of spectral compression to improve spectral efficiency. WAM can simply be substituted for existing QAM technology in any product design. Some of WAM's features should result in simpler transmitter designs that are less expensive and use less power.

For the CES demonstration next month, MagnaCom has partnered with Altera Corp., which provides custom field programmable gate arrays, ASICs and other custom logic solutions.

 

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