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Needle-less trial set for start

Tony Moore (via SMH) | April 18, 2013
A Brisbane scientist is preparing to begin field trials of an invention expected to get life-saving vaccines to children around the world immeasurably cheaper and years faster than is currently possible. And it's all without the use of needles.

A nanopatch can fit on a fingertip.

A nanopatch can fit on a fingertip. Photo: Supplied

A Brisbane scientist is preparing to begin field trials of an invention expected to get life-saving vaccines to children around the world immeasurably cheaper and years faster than is currently possible.

And it's all without the use of needles.

Professor Mark Kendall is the inventor of the Nanopatch - a strip smaller than a postage stamp that has thousands of microscopic points, which can inject disease-breaking vaccines into the skin.

A microscopic view of the nanopatch.

A microscopic view of the nanopatch. Photo: Supplied

For nine years, Professor Kendall and a team of international researchers have been working on the "needle-less" vaccination in the laboratory.

In very simple terms, the technology is designed to deliver a vaccine - that now costs $50 for three injections - to children for about 50 cents without a needle in sight.

In October, University of Queensland Professor Kendall will test the fruits of his labour when he begins field trials.

‘We will be going into the Papua New Guinea Highlands later this year for a follow-up usability trial,’’ he said.

 

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