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Motorola Droid Turbo: four things wrong and four things right

Mikael Ricknäs | Oct. 30, 2014
Motorola Mobility's Droid Turbo has a big battery and a powerful processor, but it also lacks a microSD card slot and optical imaging stabilization.

LTE

The Droid Turbo beats Apple's new iPhones on several hardware specs, but LTE is the area where Apple comes out on top. The versions of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus Verizon sells have 16 LTE bands compared to five on the Droid Turbo, which makes it much less suitable for use abroad. The difference is even bigger compared to the 20-band versions Sprint offers. International roaming using LTE is still not widespread, but will become more common during the two-year contract length Droid Turbo buyers are expected to sign.

Cameras

I haven't had much time to use the Droid Turbo's 21-megapixel camera, so future reviewers may have more to say about it, but the lack of optical image stabilization is a problem. The feature would make it easier to take pictures in the dark, as well as with one hand (for instance, photo taking at concerts and sporting events is ubiquitous these days), and it would shoot better videos. The feature has become much more common on expensive smartphones this year. Another camera trend this year has been front cameras with higher resolutions, but the Droid Turbo is again stuck in the past with 2-megapixel resolution.

Bloatware

A disadvantage with getting a smartphone that a mobile operator has handled is the number of applications that are added, whether you like them or not. The Droid Turbo is no different in this regard. Operators should leave it up to buyers to choose what they want. If the apps are any good, users will find them. Many smartphone vendors have already cleaned up the user interface on their devices, and it's now time to do the same on the application side.

 

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