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Mobile networks limber up for the Internet of Things

Stephen Lawson | Feb. 23, 2015
Changes starting to take place behind the scenes in mobile networks may eventually pay dividends to anyone with a smartphone, a connected refrigerator or an IT department.

Changes starting to take place behind the scenes in mobile networks may eventually pay dividends to anyone with a smartphone, a connected refrigerator or an IT department.

Carriers have done things pretty much the same way for years, with cellular base stations at the edge of their networks feeding into a series of specialized appliances at central facilities. Now they're virtualizing those networks in several ways, seeking the same rewards that enterprises have reaped by virtualizing data centers: efficiency and flexibility. The trend will be in full swing at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona next month.

It's good news for mobile users that they may not hear much about. A more efficient network leaves more free capacity for the video or application you want to run, and a more flexible carrier could quickly launch services in the future that you don't even know you'll need yet. The new architectures may even change how some businesses pay for mobile services.

Just as enterprises used to buy separate servers for each application, carriers often use dedicated hardware for each function involved in delivering a service, such as billing and authentication. Years of mergers have left multiple legacy platforms, adding to the mess. As a result, rolling out a new service for a customer, such as a VPN, can take weeks.

The new approach that's gaining ground, called NFV (network functions virtualization), turns each piece of the puzzle into software that can run on standard computing hardware.

NFV is a pretty well accepted idea now, though it may take years to be implemented in carrier networks. Companies such as Cisco Systems, Oracle, and the team of Nokia and HP are now tackling the next challenge: making all those virtualized network functions work together as a coherent system instead of separate applications. They say getting all the speed and efficiency out of NFV means going deeper than hardware consolidation.

"Virtualized chaos is still chaos," said Kelly Ahuja, Cisco's senior vice president of service provider products and solutions.

As NFV becomes a well-oiled machine, it should help carriers operate more like cloud computing providers and also develop entirely new kinds of services. The Internet of Things may demand it.

Ahuja compared the carrier network of the future to a hotel where customers will buy services for a short time instead of signing up for long contracts. All the cells, towers and wires in the network would stick around, but the carrier would spin up the bandwidth and other resources for a particular customer on demand.

For example, an electric utility that needs to poll millions of wireless smart meters at a certain time, but not connect to them constantly, could pay a carrier to provision a short-term service that collects data from the meters. Once the utility was finished with the service, all the network and computing resources would be available for the next customer.

 

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