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Microsoft to face computer makers' rebellion at CES

Gregg Keizer | Jan. 2, 2014
Windows 8.1 PCs that also run Android should 'scare the heck' out of Microsoft, says analyst

Ideally, the Android apps would run in full-screen mode after the user clicked on its tile within Windows 8.1.

While some have mocked the idea — previously, Bajarin called Asus' Trio "gimmicky" — Moorhead said that the maneuver is legitimate. "Tactically, this is a way for OEMs to differentiate their products, and build out the amount of apps on their devices," he said.

Focus on mobile apps
The latter is among OEMs' biggest concerns about its software partner. Microsoft has been criticized by customers, analysts and even computer makers for the small size, relative to Apple and Google, of its Metro app store. Selling touch-enabled laptops has not been easy for OEMs because consumers have balked at paying the higher prices when they see little in return from Windows and its app arena.

By adding Android apps to the available inventory, the computer makers can promote their wares as able to handle not just legacy Windows software but also Google's OS and its enormous ecosystem.

If that smacks of some desperation, well, OEMs are desperate. They've watched their PC business shrink over the last 24 months as consumers worldwide have postponed upgrades or forgone new purchases, instead spending their technology dollars on smartphones, tablets and hybrid "phablets" — large-screen phones that double as a diminutive tablet for basic tasks like watching video.

Also, many OEMs who depended for decades on Microsoft and each iteration of Windows to bump up sales have been critical of the Redmond, Wash. company's Windows 8 implementation and strategy, and with the firm's decision to enter the hardware business and directly compete with them.

"OEMs are throwing some real deep passes as they see double-digit declines in the PC market," Moorhead observed. "This is one of the long balls that they're throwing, hoping something sticks."

For Moorhead, PC Plus is also another sign that OEMs are, in the face of Windows 8's sluggish start and shaky reputation, willing to desert Microsoft and enlist alternate OSes, even if those moves are experimental in scale.

"Strategically, [PC Plus] could get millions of consumers more comfortable with Android on PCs," said Moorhead. "The gamble is coincident with OEMs' interest in alternative operating systems. Just imagine for a second what happens when Android gets an improved large-screen experience."

Some computer makers, including Windows stalwarts like Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Lenovo, have already introduced laptops powered by Google's browser-based Chrome OS as a way to circumvent Windows on screens larger than tablet-sized displays.

Limited options
Android and, to a much lesser extent, Chrome OS, are the only alternate games in town for OEMs. Linux has failed to spark interest except among a tiny fraction of technology's cognoscenti. Apple's iOS and OS X are out of bounds, as Apple restricts them to its own hardware.

 

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