Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Microsoft looks for its way in mobile app market

Juan Carlos Perez | Nov. 10, 2014
By unlocking core edit functions in its free Office apps for iOS and, later, Android, Microsoft is trying to close out pesky rivals in the mobile market and lure new subscribers to Office 365.

By unlocking core edit functions in its free Office apps for iOS and, later, Android, Microsoft is trying to close out pesky rivals in the mobile market and lure new subscribers to Office 365.

Accomplishing those goals is vital if the company is to protect and grow its huge Office franchise. But success is far from assured, with the latest moves coming seven months after it released Word, PowerPoint and Excel for the iPad, and more than a year after an initial, weaker version of Office Mobile for iPhones.

The iPad apps were widely praised, but many questioned the wisdom of requiring a subscription for anything beyond the ability to view properly formatted files, since the App Store is brimming with free alternatives, including Apple's iWork and Google's Docs, Slides and Sheets.

"This is a rebalancing of what Microsoft makes available for free," said Phil Karcher, a Forrester Research analyst.

It's offering enough capabilities to expand the number of free users it can attract, while http://www.cio.com.au/article/559065/what-can-can-t-do-free-mobile-office-apps/">reserving a set of "premium" capabilities that could tempt them into subscribing to Office 365.

"Having to pay just to edit documents was a high hurdle. With the rebalancing, customers are more likely to get sucked into using the free version of the app," Karcher said.

Office Mobile for iPhones, which shipped in mid-2013, was panned for its lack of functionality, and until March this year it required an Office 365 subscription to use it. Reacting to the poor response, Microsoft is now replacing it with standalone apps for Word, Excel and PowerPoint that are more powerful because they're built from the same code base as the iPad apps.

Similar apps will be offered for Android tablets and smartphones early next year. And a touch-optimized version of Office for Windows tablets and smartphones will be released with Windows 10, possibly by mid-2015.

"Microsoft realized that compared to the competition, it wasn't looking real great, so why not offer consumers apps they can truly use, " said Guy Creese, a Gartner analyst. "This is a response to market pressures to give users what they'd like to have."

But time is of the essence. The iPad has been out since 2010, and during the period when Office was non-existent for iOS and Android, and when it later required a subscription, people latched onto whatever productivity apps were available.

"We did a field research study about 18 months ago and asked people what they were using [for mobile productivity] and it was all over the map," Creese said. "In the absence of Office, they resorted to a wide variety of apps."

A portion of those people will stick with what they've gotten used to.

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.