Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Man arrested for child porn in cloud; viewing on iPad

Mark Hattersley | March 6, 2013
Following reports that Apple continues to sporadically ban "barely legal teen" and other phrases from iCloud; Verizon has scanned its cloud service and reported indecent images to the police.

This situation does, however, continue to throw light on our relationship with cloud services. As our personal information (including images, documents and messages) continues to move seamlessly from local devices with large hard drives, to cloud-based servers we are beginning to see that our personal information is monitored, processed and, if necessary, reported to the authorities.

Services like iCloud (with iPhoto and Documents in the Cloud) are designed to make it as easy as possible for people to seamlessly move their personal information from local storage to Apple's servers. And with privacy concerns surrounding the arrival of Google Glass, and its ability to innocuously record events it may be that our whole relationship with personal privacy has to be rethought.

Apple itself has repeatedly suggested that it has a moral duty to remove objectional content from its servers. Back in 2010 Apple Phil Schiller told The New York Times: "An increasing number of apps containing very objectionable content," had been submitted by a small number of iPhone developers... It came to the point where we were getting customer complaints from women who found the content getting too degrading and objectionable, as well as parents who were upset with what their kids were able to see."

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.