Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Man arrested for child porn in cloud; viewing on iPad

Mark Hattersley | March 6, 2013
Following reports that Apple continues to sporadically ban "barely legal teen" and other phrases from iCloud; Verizon has scanned its cloud service and reported indecent images to the police.

Cloud-based child porn continues to be in the news with this report that William Steven Albaugh from Baltimore has been arrested for storing indecent images of children on a cloud services, and viewing them on an iPad.

According to The Baltimore Sun, the US Network provider Verizon reported the images - stored on its Verizon Backup and Sharing service - to the local police who took immediate action.

The Baltimore Sun reports: "William Steven Albaugh, 67, a deacon at St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church on Belair Road, was arrested at his Nottingham home at 7:45 a.m. Police had searched Albaugh's Treadway Court home and said they found images of children on his Verizon Online account and on thumb drives.

Police recovered two CPU towers, a laptop computer, multiple storage devices and an iPad. Albaugh told police that he used the tablet to view nudist websites that include pictures of children, according to charging documents."

The news follows our story that Apple appears to be sporadically blocking the term "barely legal teen" from its iCloud Mail service. According to Macworld sister site Infoworld it has been doing so for some four months now.

However, many Macworld readers have reported that the blockage is sporadic, and inconsistent suggesting that it is more to do with combating spam than a consistent block on conversation. It does, however, block legitimate Mail such as our test which used the phrase "barely legal teenage driver".

Macworld's Dan Frakes said "Occasionally, automated spam filters may incorrectly block legitimate email. If the customer feels that a legitimate message is blocked, we encourage customers to report it to AppleCare."

Frakes suggests that that's a terrible answer: "How do you report the non-arrival of an email that you never received?... it's the lack of transparency about this filtering". He continues to suggest that Apple already has a spam filtering service in the form of Junk Mail (which enables users to view spam messages if they want).

Users can always install more powerful systems such as SpamSieve if they want or require stronger levels of Mail control.

But if Apple blocks a message at its end you have no control over it, and you'll never know it was meant to arrive. Also, as many Reddit contributors were keen to point out, the phrase "barely legal teen" is not illegal, and if people wish to receive mails containing the term they should be allowed to do so. Perhaps even if they are spam.

Clearly, storing indecent images of children in an cloud service is neither legal nor morally right. And we are rightfully glad that Albaugh has been arrested.

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.