Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

LG Optimus G Pro is an oversized phone with a beautiful screen

Hayden Dingman | May 29, 2013
LG hasn't always been a fan favorite: For a long time the company was best known for its budget handsets that did little to stand out from the competition. In recent years, however, LG has earned a reputation for creating solid, reliable devices. The LG Optimus G Pro continues that string of successes, blowing away its nearest competitor in size and design, the Samsung Galaxy Note II, and rivaling the recent HTC One and Samsung Galaxy S4 as one of the best Android phones on the market. The G Pro runs like a sports car engine in the body of a family minivan--an unassuming aesthetic mixed with luxury performance. Provided you can fit it in your

The phone's battery shouldn't have any problem handling an average day of use. However, the huge screen definitely chews into battery life during prolonged usage. If you're heavy on games or constantly checking Twitter, consider toting a charger on your outings.

One area where the Galaxy Note II bests the G Pro is in multitasking. Though LG touts the ability to view multiple apps on the G Pro, that feature is fairly limited: You can't view apps side by side but instead must rely on LG's QSlide feature to do more than one thing at a time. QSlide can launch one of four apps--calendar, notes, video, or calculator--above whatever's currently running. While the international version of QSlide includes a browser, that's not in the U.S. version. As a result, the G Pro's multitasking capability feels lopped off at the knees.

AT&T only
For some reason, LG made the baffling decision to lock the G Pro to AT&T, so keep that in mind if you're considering this device.

The G Pro's call quality leaves a bit to be desired. Noise sometimes crept into the outgoing voice, and the incoming audio sounded a little tinny (though plenty loud). The handset is also not very good at cutting out background noise--which is odd, since using speakerphone on the G Pro makes you sound incredibly distant even if you're only 6 inches away.

4G LTE reception was fast enough in our San Francisco office location to stream video and download apps over AT&T's network with ease (your results will vary depending on AT&T's coverage in your area).

13 is a lot of megapixels, but...

Even though it's packed with pixels, the 13-megapixel camera on the G Pro didn't meet our expectations. Images taken under normal conditions were significantly fuzzier than what we've seen from the similarly spec'd Samsung Galaxy S4. The G Pro's low-light performance was better than that of Samsung's offering, but overall the G Pro's camera performance was subpar.

The G Pro's camera app has a number of extras, including HDR (high dynamic range) and Panorama mode, both of which have their share of quirks. Panoramic shots look sharp at first glance, but lose clarity even faster than the G Pro's standard shooting mode once you begin zooming in. The HDR setting works well, but takes too long to shoot and process images for regular use.

The G Pro also features an "Intelligent Auto" mode, which adjusts aperture, white balance, and shutter speed on the fly to take better pictures. Unfortunately the mode is a bit fidgety, especially when it comes to white balance. It has a bad habit of completely changing the white balance for a split second right as you go to snap the perfect shot, leaving everything too orange or blue. It's better to adjust the options manually.

 

Previous Page  1  2  3  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.