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Leaked Windows 10 build 10051 finally shows new Mail, Calendar apps

Woody Leonhard | April 7, 2015
Over the weekend, Russian leaker(s) WZor once again proved their mettle by posting a new leaked Windows 10 build, the 64-bit only 10051, on the mail.ru website.

Over the weekend, Russian leaker(s) WZor once again proved their mettle by posting a new leaked Windows 10 build, the 64-bit only 10051, on the mail.ru website. Others rapidly took the leaked WIM file (stuffed in a RAR!) and turned it into an ISO for general consumption.

For the intrepid:

There's at least one other ISO floating around that claims to be build 10051, but its hashes don't match the verified ones here. The pedigree of that other ISO is unknown.

The build seemed reasonably stable in my tests, but there are clearly some very rough edges. Rumor has it that Microsoft will wait for build 10054 (or 10055?) to clear its internal testing cycle before releasing this latest manna to the masses — quite possibly later this week. Build 10051 is clearly only for people who are hell-bent on tearing into the new features. That said, the new features are intriguing.

If you want to install 10051 with a local account only, during the installation choose "This device belongs to me," then "Connect my account later." You'll be prompted for a local username and password.

The stars of this build: Mail and Calendar, which are different from (and superior to) the Mail and Calendar apps in Windows 8/8.1. Final naming has yet to be announced, but it would be in character for the shipping versions to carry the Outlook brand.

In Windows 10, Mail and Calendar are actually one app, with a single build number, in this case 17.3925.42001.0. The People app, which used to be chained to Windows 8.1 Mail and Calendar at the ankles and elbows, is now a freestanding app. In this leaked beta version, People doesn't launch; it's a toothless stub.

The new Mail explicitly supports Exchange, Office 365, IMAP, and Google accounts. POP, too — that in itself is a huge achievement, compared to Windows 8.1's Metro Mail app. Unfortunately, there's no commingled inbox. As you can see from Figure 1, you must select the account you wish to use, on the bottom left, before you can start working with that account's mail.

The giant column on the left can be shrunk by simply clicking on the hamburger icon. See Figure 2.

It's easy to switch between Mail and Calendar by clicking or tapping on the corresponding icon on the left. (The Smiley face is for leaving feedback.)

The Options pane, accessed through the gear icon at the bottom on the left, holds the kind of eye candy that will appeal to some — a custom background picture, for example, that only shows up when you don't have any mail open. It also lets you set actions for swipe right (set flag by default) and swap right (delete by default). But it doesn't have any of the fundamental options (i.e., grouping, message display font) currently found in Windows 8.1's Metro Mail.

 

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