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Jon Burgerman tells us how to train your creative brain

Ashleigh Allsopp | Sept. 9, 2013
Artist Jon Burgerman lets us in on the secrets to creativity, which include ditching your routine, turning off your computer and wearing colourful socks.

Artist Jon Burgerman lets us in on the secrets to creativity, which include ditching your routine, turning off your computer and wearing colourful socks.

We caught up with Jon right after his brilliantly funny and inspiring talk at the Reasons to be Creative event in Brighton to find out how he manages to create so much art and so many characters, how he stays inspired and how to train your creative brain.

Your portfolio of work is huge! Do you have to draw all day in order to create so much art?
JB: "I work very quickly so when I do work I make a lot in short space of time. But some days I don't do any drawing because I don't get the chance.

"The problem with travel and emailing and meetings and everything is that a lot of my day is organising and prepping and researching and other stuff. So I'm not always sat with a pen in my hand unfortunately. But I still manage to crank it out.

"The good thing about drawing is you can do it anywhere. So, if I'm on a train and I've got an idea or I just feel like I want to do a drawing -- because drawing, you just feel like you to draw -- then you can do it. So I do work on aeroplanes and trains. Anywhere."

You're making so much art, some of it just for fun, but would you advise artists to always be thinking about how their work can be used commercially?
JB: "Yes and no. Draw a lot, see what happens.

"Think of it like an instrument: not every song on the piano that you practice has to be the best song. You're not always worried about people hearing it, but it's about making it, learning what you're good at and what you want to improve on trying out your ideas.

"That's what happens when you draw. When you're drawing you're thinking, you're honing your dexterity of holding the pen, all these kind of things. Lots of things are going on all at once in your head, in your mind, in your hand. So this is good to try to hone and experiment.

"But whether it's about money or not... Is it good to be concerned about money all the time? Work when you've got work and do the work when you've got commissions and things and then, when you haven't, make what you want to make, what you wish you were getting paid for and treat it with the same energy and respect that you would for your commercial stuff."

 

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