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iPhone 5 - should i care?

Sim Ahmed | Oct. 3, 2012
It's that time of year again. Apple has released a new phone and millions of people around the world are looking at their current iPhones with contempt.

It's that time of year again. Apple has released a new phone and millions of people around the world are looking at their current iPhones with contempt.

The iPhone 5, like every generation of iPhone before it, promises to be a game changer - but before you go ahead and throw away your previous iPhone let's take a look at whether the iPhone 5 really lives up to its claims.

By now you've most likely seen the iPhone on TV, magazines, and plastered all over websites. Placed next to the previous two generations of iPhone it might be possible to not tell the difference between them and the iPhone 5. It's not until you hold the phone in your hand that you can appreciate the differences in design.

Embarrassingly the first word I said when I held the iPhone 5 was "wow". I was surprised how light the phone was. At 112 grams it's almost 20 percent lighter than the iPhone 4S.

The back of the iPhone 5 is made of the same aluminium that's used on the bodies of MacBooks, and it's bounded by two glass panels on the top and bottom. This boxed design makes the iPhone 5 look almost unfinished but I was told by an Apple representative that if the entire back was made of aluminium the radio signals for cellular and wi-fi would be disrupted.

I was very disappointed to see that my 'pristine' iPhone 5 had scuff marks and one small knick straight out of the box. This problem was limited to the bevelled edges on the front and back of the phone, and seems to be a common problem if customer complaints online are any indication.

Admittedly these flaws in the metal are minuscule, but when you're paying over $1000 for a phone the expectation of quality is set much higher than what Apple managed to achieve in this instance.

New with the iPhone 5 design is its Lightning power connector, which replaces the decade-old 30-pin connector.

Although this means you'll need to buy new spare cables (or Lightning adapters for your old cables) Apple says chips inside the cable itself dynamically control the power going to your device to better maintain the battery health. The lack of a crevice means the Lightning cable collects less dust and is less likely to become damaged, or damage the iPhone.

It's taken six long years but Apple has finally increased the screen size of the latest iPhone. Four inches might still seem small compared to what's on offer with flagship Android devices, but I found the iPhone 5's display hits the sweet spot in the compromise between screen real-estate and practicality.

 

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