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iPad spreadsheet Permanent doesn't really add up

Rob Griffiths | March 21, 2013
Permanent is a new spreadsheet-ish app for the iPad. As something of a spreadsheet junkie, I was excited to see an alternative entrant in this rather staid marketplace. And "alternative" really is the proper word, for Permanent is unlike any spreadsheet you've ever used. Diving in, I was really hoping to love this app, to see real progress in the niche that is spreadsheets. Alas, it was not to be.

Permanent is a new spreadsheet-ish app for the iPad. As something of a spreadsheet junkie, I was excited to see an alternative entrant in this rather staid marketplace. And "alternative" really is the proper word, for Permanent is unlike any spreadsheet you've ever used. Diving in, I was really hoping to love this app, to see real progress in the niche that is spreadsheets. Alas, it was not to be.

Permanent--which runs only in landscape mode--launches to a blank white canvas with a top and side frame. The side frame lists all your projects, while the top of the screen contains a few buttons and the title of the selected project.

The first time I tried to open the Demo Project, Permanent crashed. While this wasn't encouraging, it opened successfully on the second try.

Once open, the Demo Project displays a work area with two overlapping worksheets, and two background images. On one sheet are the app's 30 (yes, just 30) functions; the other shows some operators and examples of how they're used. With only 30 functions, there's obviously no compatibility with Numbers or Excel spreadsheets; only the simplest of spreadsheets would work. The two background pictures are apparently there to show you that you can, in fact, have pictures. That's it as far as hands-on instruction goes; there's no tutorial or manual to be seen.

Unlike most any other spreadsheet, you cannot create a table that's longer than the iPad's relatively-short landscape mode screen. Instead, you scroll around inside the table area. Combine these artificially-short tables with tables stacked on top of one another, and the concept of printing gets much more complicated. But at present, you can't print, so I can't explain how the program addresses this challenge. Even if you could print, the program's lack of cell styling (no fonts, no number formats, no borders, no shading, no color, nothing!) and missing column/row width/height controls mean that you probably wouldn't find the output very readable.

There's a separate numeric keypad screen for entering numeric data. You can reposition the keypad itself in the pane by tapping and dragging the "0" key, which is a nice touch.

However, the four buttons for navigating the tables--previous/next column/row--are oddly laid out. If you've got nothing but numbers to enter, the numeric keypad will save time; if you have text and numbers to enter, you'll still be flipping between keyboards--though having the mathematical operators here still saves the time over Apple's layout, which puts some operators (like + and *) on a separate screen from the numerals themselves.

Interacting with the tables is odd, too. To move a table, you have to first unselect any cells by tapping outside the table area, then tap the table once to select it, then tap an icon in the top menu bar, then tap and hold on a move arrow in the center of the table. In other operations, some buttons that must be tapped appear under a dark bar that makes them look inactive--but they're both active and required.

 

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