Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Intel's tiny Curie chip for wearables coming to Arduino early next year

James Niccolai | Oct. 19, 2015
The Arduino 101 will go on sale in the first quarter for $30

School kids and hardware enthusiasts who want to start tinkering with Intel's tiny Curie chip will be able to get their hands on it early next year in the form of an Arduino development board.

Curie is a new chip module that Intel showed at the International CES in January. About a centimeter across, it includes a 32-bit microcontroller, Bluetooth Low Energy for connectivity, a small amount of RAM and Flash, and a six-axis sensor with a gyrometer and accelerometer.

krzanich curie
Intel Intel's Curie SOC for wearables

The chip is built for wearable devices like a smart pendant or smart bracelet, but it could go into just about any small gadget that doesn't need a lot of local processing power, such as a remote-controlled car.

Arduino's Curie board will be marketed as Arduino 101 in the U.S. and as Genuino 101 overseas, in line with how Arduino brands its other products. It will be priced at US$30, or about 27 euros, and go on sale in the first quarter next year.

The board isn't really small enough to build a decent wearable -- it's 7cm long and 5.5cm wide -- but it's OK for prototypes and getting familiar with Curie's capabilities. Intel or its partners are expected to offer smaller Curie boards in the future.

arduino 101 specs
Intel Specs for the Arduino 101/Genuino 101. Click on the table to enlarge.

The board is aimed partly at schools, where it can be used in the classroom to get kids interested in programming and electronics. But it's also aimed at the maker community, which has been using Arduino boards to build all kinds of products.

Intel has been courting the maker community hard. It's announcing Arduino 101 at the Maker Faire in Rome on Friday, where Intel is a sponsor, and the board will be featured on an upcoming reality TV show, America's Greatest Makers.

Having missed out on the smartphone market, and with PC sales in decline, Intel wants to make sure it doesn't miss the next wave in computing, which might turn out to be be wearables. It hopes the maker community will produce a hit product based on one of its chips.

intel arduino family
Intel Intel's line-up of Arduino boards. Click on the table to enlarge.

It already offers a couple of Arduino boards, Edison and Galileo, but they're more expensive and require more skill to program because they run the Linux OS.

Arduino 101 is physically smaller and less than half the price, and it runs a small real-time operating system that makes it more suitable for young students to work with, said Jay Melican, whose title at Intel is "maker czar."

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.